Leo Gardner

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Leo Gardner
Posted over 1 year ago
Should we feel gratitude for our life? To whom?
Yea, I agree. Theoretically, the ego (the self-importance version, not the conscious/subconscious mediator) can and should be eliminated, but realistically that is not likely to happen...hence the reason gratitude is necessary.
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Leo Gardner
Posted over 1 year ago
Should we feel gratitude for our life? To whom?
Well, it seems we are actually in full agreement on most points. I might just not be communicating that very well. I do believe that we are 'selfish', but I don't think that is bad in any way, especially if we consider ourselves part of a whole. Think of why we are here: nature/God has given us the sun which gives us energy which is how we are here existing today. So what is 'ours' to give in the first place when we have been given everything? *I'm not judging anyone, i don't believe in that. I'm judging actions that people commit, which I do believe in.
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Leo Gardner
Posted over 1 year ago
Should we feel gratitude for our life? To whom?
To answer the original question: Do non-believers feel gratitude for these things? If yes, to whom? Everyone has a 'god' (a belief), whatever that may be, however its defined, and whatever it is named. Therefore there is no such thing as a non-believer. Everyone believes in something. I will not say anyone should feel gratitude at all. that is their choice. But i do think it behooves everyone to do so, and then of course to act on that feeling... Ex: If you believe in 'God', and believe that He gave you life, then you should 'feel' grateful to him for it.....and give it back to Him the best way you know how :) (acting on your gratitude) or Ex: If you believe in 'Science', etc., then you should feel grateful,, and give your life back in the best way you know how. Act on your gratitude: -take care of your parents, -help you children, -protect the environment or like Louis put it: We should feel gratitude to those that provide life for us. These people can be one's parents, teachers, etc. But at the end of the day, whether you call it God, Singularity, or Primal Existence, I think we all have a deep sense of gratitude to the source of life itself.
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Leo Gardner
Posted over 1 year ago
Should we feel gratitude for our life? To whom?
I'm saying we don't have a choice. We are hard-wired to be 'selfish'. It's in our genes, yes, but it's also just simply impossible any other way. Every conscious decision I make is determined solely by what I 'want', and is therefore a selfish one. Ex: I can give all my money to the world, but my decision to give was determined by some 'want' that i had, hence the 'decision' to give. Otherwise the transaction would be described as the money being 'taken' from me. Some say selfishness is the root of evil, but I say the ego is. Once we realize that we don't exist as we think we do, but rather that we are just a part of a larger organism, then we can be selfish for the whole (unselfish). In religious terms, we should be 'selfish' for God's family of which we comprise....or: The Earth is Me and I am The Earth. The ego is the illusion that we create of ourselves, and hinders our progress. as for communicating gratitude, I said: 1) i believe in saying 'thank you', as acknowledging a good deed is important. (communication is important) 2) saying 'thank you' to someone who helps you is as pointless as saying 'sorry' to someone you have wronged. the first 1 is obvious, but with the second 2, I am NOT claiming that 'saying' thank you is pointless, I'm saying that it would be AS pointless AS...,,....I'm attacking those people who receive a good deed or energy, SAY thank you to the giver, and then squander/waste (fail to appreciate...) what they have received.
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Leo Gardner
Posted over 1 year ago
Should we feel gratitude for our life? To whom?
yes. do unto others. yes. i believe these ideas are loaded with value. they are simple in concept, but seemingly never simplistic in their application. for example, we should 'love our enemies', but that may mean tough love in many cases. (a mother loves her child, but may need to slap him on the wrist occasionally) if my enemy comes into my house and harms me, I will show him love by sending him to state prison as opposed to giving him a hug. prison will not be his punishment, it will just be what he needs to heal whether he realizes it or not. Then I will pay my state taxes, etc. and trust that the system will cure him and not harm him; But I will not wish evil upon him, as nobody would have anything to gain from that.
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Leo Gardner
Posted over 1 year ago
Should we feel gratitude for our life? To whom?
i meant saying 'thank you' in so much as saying it without actually meaning it.... I believe that in order to MEAN it, you have to have intention to back up the words with some action. we tend to associate with people that we believe will help to make us MORE, in whatever way that may be (reciprocal altruism)....because if we just gave our energy to anyone and anything, we would soon be broke and eventually dead. I don't 'expect' my mother to 'return the favor' when i buy her a christmas present.....but it doesn't hurt to be giving it to her in the warmth of her home. When she says 'thank you', she might as well be saying, "yes, you are welcome to stay in my house; and oh btw, don't worry about the heating bill." i believe in saying 'thank you', as acknowledging the good deed is important....but i think there is always an 'I owe you one' attached to every 'thank you.' (*i can't say sorry and mean it without intending to repair the damage...)