Jesse Bryant

Delmar, NY, United States

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Comments & conversations

175180
Jesse Bryant
Posted almost 2 years ago
Debate: Washington state's legalization of marijuana
In light of nearly 50% of the prisoners in federal prisons, those prisoners who you pay to keep alive, being in for small possession charges, do you still think that the gateway argument holds up? In regards again to the gateway argument, I would contend that both tobacco and alcohol are equally, if not much more important, as gateway drugs. Also, can you speak to marijuana being a schedule 1 drug? Do you agree that: a) It is proven to be an addictive substance and b) It has no proven medical use
175180
Jesse Bryant
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the reason for a) The growing attendance of dubstep/trance concerts in America and, b) The increased practice of yoga in America?
I get a general feeling that the public is beginning to react, whether it be consciously or subconsciously, to the bastardization of independence and for the first time actually realize, on a large scale, the outdatedness of "the American Dream". Both yoga and a rave sort of environment strongly promote oneness, granted both in entirely different ways. I'm not totally sure if I can adequately express this "general feeling" I have. Thoughts?
175180
Jesse Bryant
Posted almost 2 years ago
Debate: Washington state's legalization of marijuana
I found the banking issue raised the only interesting problem in this article, and judging by the complete denial of reality in most of the other claims I would only expect that the banking problem to as well be a complete hoax. Legalization will not exacerbate drug-related crime unless it is done at a federal level, in which case there will be quite a mess at the Mexican boarder. Long-term use does not in fact lead to "brain changes that cause violent behavior". THC metabolites are common among criminals first, because marijuana is the most widely used drug besides alcohol and secondly, because those same metabolites are naturally occurring in the body. The Dutch may have seen recent declines in education (down to 7th in the world, while the US is 14th), but this in no way relates to marijuana consumption, as it should be noted that only 5% of Dutch nationals use marijuana, a much lower number than in the US. Also, rates of violent crimes in California around "marijuana clubs" rising...I could not find a single institution on Google promoting them selves as a "marijuana club". The quote about "not a danger because its illegal, its illegal because its a danger" is borne from the true fact that marijuana was feared because it was a Black drug. It is in fact the least harmful common drug we have. Sorry for quoting you. I feel like we probably agree on all of these issues, but that article saddened me quite a bit. I just cannot believe this is still going on and a man like Chris Williams from Montana is being sent to prison for a minimum of 80 years for running a state sanctioned grow house. As a single parent his child has been sent to state care. What do you tell that kid? As a neuroscience major it is just brutal to watch FOX's portrayal to the public.
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Jesse Bryant
Posted almost 2 years ago
What small, everyday actions can we do to improve the distribution of food?
I haven't watched the talk, but I think the best action for those living in developed countries would be eating less, especially less meat. The reality is that these massive developed world food producers are there because there are consumers. If we ate less, and again, especially less meat, the huge corporations would have to move abroad, perhaps to the developing world to find consumers, of whom there are a lot of.
175180
Jesse Bryant
Posted almost 2 years ago
Debate: Is corruption a moral or a legal issue?
Corruption is a moral issue and thus in most developed countries is addressed in law (which are all essentially derived from esoteric beliefs). I think in the developed world there are so many laws so that most actions that would be deemed "corrupt" are just simply covered somewhere in the governing text. I mean, for what its worth, social animals like baboons and bonobos have a sense of morality. Aggressive members of a tribe and members that steal from others are shunned etc. and obviously these tribes do not have laws in the sense that I think you are talking about. That brings up what I think is a more potent debate as to whether there is any real difference between morals and laws at all.
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Jesse Bryant
Posted almost 2 years ago
What is the primary role of the museum in the modern world?
I think the type of museum matters immensely. In general, I would say though that the primary role is to aid us in walking through what we once were. If that lends itself to historical research, so be it. If it inspires cultures obsessed with what we once were and congregate in a social sense then sure, that's that museums purpose, but I do not think that there is a museum in existence that wouldn't fit into my above definition of a purpose.