Jack & Barbra Donachy

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Jack & Barbra Donachy
Posted over 1 year ago
Dan Barber: How I fell in love with a fish
Hi Dan, Interesting response. You cite "inefficiency in distribution." So… what do you think is the root cause of this "inefficiency?" We maintain that distribution problems are a symptom of overpopulation, in that in many locales, people have overwhelmed local food sources. In addition, the notion that there is an inexhaustible supply of arable land and "farmable" seas is killing this planet. More people mean more forests cut down in the name of palm oil and soy bean production, more near-shore seas turned to fish farming, further aquifer depletion and so on. For those of us who wish to live in a world where biodiversity means more than farmed fish and soy beans, it's a sobering picture. As we indicated in our initial letter, "we like what we saw in the video about Palma Vista." However, we remain very concerned that anyone believes a solution to world hunger exists without addressing its root cause - overpopulation. There are not enough potential Palma Vistas in the world - nor enough forests available to cut down for soy bean production - to sustainably feed the billions and billions of humans on this earth.
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Jack & Barbra Donachy
Posted over 1 year ago
Dan Barber: How I fell in love with a fish
We already HAVE the ecological model of fish production Dan Barber describes in this video: It's the Alaska model for sustainable harvest of wild and wild-caught salmon. Like the vast Spanish wetlands of Veta la Palma, in Alaska we have environs such as the Bristol Bay Watershed and the Tongass National Forest - pristine, self-renewing environs where salmon are a key species and are relied upon by orcas, seals, porpoises, eagles, bears and a host of other animals. Like the Veta la Palma model, a certain percentage of these salmon are harvested for human consumption; but 10's of millions of salmon are allowed to go free so that they can sustain the environment. We like what we saw in this video about Veta la Palma. But we LOVE what is already happening in Alaska and what has been going on for countless generations. We hope Dan Barber and everyone who cares about quality food, healthy ecosystems and sustainability will join us in absolutely refusing to have anything to do with farmed salmon. Farmed salmon - cheap, unsustainable - take value away from wild-caught salmon, and that in turn devalues the salmon forests, rivers and oceans wild salmon need. That being said, Dan makes two errors in this talk. First, he lumps salmon in with tuna and other fish that are being overharvested. While it is true that tuna and Most large fish species are being irresponsibly harvested, it is simply NOT true of wild-caught Alaska salmon. The notion that salmon are being overharvested and that we therefore "need" farmed salmon is a lie being propagated by the salmon farming industry. His second error is to attribute world hunger to inefficient food distribution or other causes. There is one root cause of world hunger: overpopulation. "How can we feed the world?" Dan asks. The answer is, "With 7 billion people on this planet and more coming every day, we can't. We Must begin to seriously engage in educating people about overpopulation."