Chris Kristiansen

San Francisco, CA, United States

About Chris

Bio

Master's in Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Golden Gate University, San Francisco, USA.

Bachelor of Arts in Culture and Communication
University of Oslo, Norway.

Executive Courses in Coaching
BI Norwegian Business School, Norway.

Personal Trainer
The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.

Languages

Dutch, English, Norwegian

Areas of Expertise

psychology, Training - Organization Communication, Training - Leadership, Personal Trainer, Dating

An idea worth spreading

Leaders tend to forget that they are leading a group of people, not a series of numbers. The way we structure our businesses today determine whether they survive 5 to 10 years from now, and with the new generation of employees wanting different things than before. People expect rapid promotions and steep learning curves, then they want to do something else. Most businesses have no concrete plan on how to mantain a workforce, and turnover rates are higher than ever. Companies such as Google and Microsoft have distinguished themselves with how they approach keeping an intelligent, healthy workforce. They succeed in areas other technological companies fail, especially with the amounts of stress people working in technological companies face. Creativity needs space and breathing opportunities to flourish. Stress kills creativity, and teamwork even more so. This is were I hope we will see a change in the future.

I'm passionate about

Working with people face to face in highly creative ways. Teaching, Coaching, Business, Psychology, and Technology in a facinating blend of creative genius.

Talk to me about

Organizational Development, Psychology, Innovation, Great Ideas, Creativity, Business, Marketing, Personal Training, and Coaching.

People don't know I'm good at

Juggling.. I can juggle 7 bean bags.

My TED story

I'm in the process of learning, and I find talking to great minds is one of the most beneficial ways to grow. The value of interviewing the people I look up, not only provides me with new connections, but also with invaluable knowledge. Living in a world were future challenges of environment and violence a constant concern, I'm looking for ways I can work towards helping the world cope with these issues.

Comments & conversations

Noface
Chris Kristiansen
Posted over 2 years ago
Michael Specter: The danger of science denial
I think what it all boils down to is whether this scientific experimentation can lead to things which are irreversible. If someone is ruined for life because of a vaccine, that is horrible for that one person, but perhaps better for society? I'm not altruistic - this is a philosophical standpoint where we disagree. Personally, I despise putting people's survival over everything. What about the survival of other species? Humans seem to be doing pretty well when it comes to survival and population of the globe. It is natural that we die, is it worth ruining an eco-system forever in order to prolong the time it takes to die with a few years for a few people? What about our children's children's lives? They will potentially be much worse of! This is a difficult choice. Personally I don't think it's worth experimenting on a large scale when the consequences are potentially as bad as they are. For other areas, were we know the risk factor, it is easier to make a good choice. But for GMOs, we simply don't know, and therefore we should be cautious. This talk criticizes being careful when the consequences of an action are not well known. This is why I believe the talk is flawed.
Noface
Chris Kristiansen
Posted over 2 years ago
Michael Specter: The danger of science denial
That we have been manipulating nature for our existence has also lead to a lot of bad! It is a one-sided talk. Take salmon for example where the "farmed salmon" which can feed so many of us escape and now severely endanger the wild salmon. We don't know any of the long-term effects of eating genetically modified food on the human body, or the eco-system. What is the trade-off? You have to look deeper than just the effects of GMO's on hunger. The negative consequences are potentially catastrophic. We can never know the full consequences of our actions. Even today we do so much that has bad consequences, even for ourselves, and we see examples of that every single day! Nuclear power-plants near the water in Japan, countries' refusal to reduce CO2 emissions, vaccines that later are found to have horrible side-effects. The list goes on. This is not a thing of the past, it is happening right now!
Noface
Chris Kristiansen
Posted over 2 years ago
Michael Specter: The danger of science denial
Huge problems with this talk. Science is great, but I'm sorry to say it can't predict the future like he implies, and science often makes mistakes. In fact, us humans seem to use science to do more damage to the planet than anything else. How about global warming, pollution, over-population, war, and increasing problems lik astma and eczema? Most of which have been caused indirectly by our scientific efforts to make the world a better place. I don't know about you, but I prefer to leave nature be, and that we stop thinking we know best, when we clearly don't. History shows how much problems we cause every time we try to "fix" nature to gain short-term benefits, only to disturb natural Eco-systems and cause major problems over the long term. Let us not make that same mistake again.