noemi valentin

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Noface
noemi valentin
Posted over 2 years ago
Ruby Wax: What's so funny about mental illness?
I agree, I do not make sense. My explanation. I am being treated for PSTD, as a overcharge of the nervous system during a prolonged time of sexual abuse trauma, so to my understanding of it is being treated as a nervous system overcharge. However, "Mental Illness" term says nothing useful to those that lack medical training. I live in a Building where a third of the residents are send here by the Dept of Mental Health; many suffering of obvious disabling psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, brain tumors, deep depression, veterans with psychotic episodes, strokes, car accident brain damage, drug problems and other conditions that affect cognitive functions and behavior and that each has different challenges. For the untrained staff and neighbors the "Mentally Ill" (including those diagnosed with PSTD) are considered out of touch with reality, checked out, out there, tripping, hallucinating, not having all the marbles, in one of their days, being weird without any distinction. And exactly that is what most people think when the words "Mentally Ill". That is why I avoid using those words to describe my condition. When I say PSTD is not a "mental illness", I mean that my mental illness (there goes the words again) is not about a malfunctioning brain that that do not understand situations or can analyze or communicate truth. The administrators here like most people in the world do not have access to medical terminology or training, so during my temporary PSTD symptoms--frazzled, hypersensitivity, agitated--I am treated like I am not out of touch, seeing things, checked out, out there, tripping, hallucinating and so on. I am treated condescendingly, and talked to like I do not know what I am talking about. In that sense is that I prefer to say that PSTD is a neurological/nervous system related illness and not a mental health illness. I hate the phrase. It is the same as saying crazy in fancier words
Noface
noemi valentin
Posted almost 3 years ago
What experiences have made you more comfortable with mental health disorders?
The experience that made me become most comfortable with my own and other's people mental illness was one conversation I had with a neighbor, a veteran, that in a moment of clarity he said: "People say I am crazy and treat me like I do not know what I am doing. No one knows how hard and so much smarter I have to be in order to live independently with my condition". It was like finding a mirror. So liberating. Then we joked about how the majority of people and care providers that give us treatment have NO IDEA how is to be in our heads. They cannot imagine the same way I cannot imagine thinking "normal" without the days floating around me. For me that conversation gave me more acceptance and made me conscious that us, those who live with mental conditions, have some sort of a special culture unfamiliar to many. That gave me comfort.
Noface
noemi valentin
Posted almost 3 years ago
Ruby Wax: What's so funny about mental illness?
Sadly one has to be a poet or a genius in order to be OK to have a mental illness. Either the person's behavior is recognized as eccentric or touched by the gods, but the rest are just ill. PSTD may cause mental illness' symptoms but is different as mental illnesses caused by physiological/neurological hereditary, tumors, head injuries or even strokes, use of brain and neurological damage by drugs and so forth. A person with Post Trauma Disorder (PSTD), can show similar symptoms to many of mental illness, but it is not the same. Saying (not her) that mental illness is the result of emotional trauma is another way to say "it is all in your head." Mental Illness is a very broad umbrella of conditions that most people are totally unfamiliar and have a narrow exposure or understanding. And that shows in condescending and ignorant attitudes. A person suffering of a mental ill condition may look spastic, have speech impediment, hear voices, be depressive, extreme mood swings like bipolar. However, because of the experience of living with a mental illness condition can also develop, thanks to it, a better understanding of the relationship between mind, body, and spirit that the "other three of the four" cannot even imagine . So, mental illness is not only about doctors, pills, institutions, and acting weird. It goes much deeper.