Reese Kolar

San Francisco, CA, United States

About Reese

Edit profile

Comments & conversations

Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
Debate: Should students rely on technology for their homework?
Hey Louise, I really liked your final point about students using higher cognitive abilities than basic memorization (ie looking up on wikipedia). I agree that if the teachers learn to adapt to the technology appropriately we will get students who are better able to use creative thinking and problem solving to answer questions instead of just basic fact digging. I mean I think this could be easily compared to when calculators came out and people were worried about the fact that students wouldn't be able to do basic mathematics in their head, however that technology has allowed us to move past the basic drudge work and spend more time on the process of mathematical reasoning. Although I do sometimes feel helpless without a calculator, I won't lie... need to practice my times tables I guess.
Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
Matt Killingsworth: Want to be happier? Stay in the moment
You should suggest another method. For now this is a beautiful example of an ancient principle. The Buddha always considered his practice of present-moment awareness a science, not to be accepted until practiced, and experiments like this are just the kind of thing that gives further validity to this concept.
Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
Matt Killingsworth: Want to be happier? Stay in the moment
I think that is where practice comes in. In buddhism you practice sitting and focusing on very simple things like your breath, but then over time you are able to expand your focus on more and more of the present moment reality. Just like when one learns a new task or learns a piece of music -- at first you must focus on every note, but then over time you are able to understand the complete composition and add accents and tempo changes while still hitting every step and every note.
Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
Matt Killingsworth: Want to be happier? Stay in the moment
Hi Jae, this is true that it may seem to make things more enjoyable, but I think the problems with this short term solution to present moment boredom or non-enjoyable activity is that it is not reality. As this talk showed, mind-wandering is very likely a cause of unhappiness later, and I believe this is caused by the fact that the mind-wandering that we are doing is usually about something that we want to happen or something that happened in the past, both of which are outside of reality. Hence when we think of future events, our in-the-moment experience of this event does not compare with our illusory model of what we would have liked to happen. This often leads to more unhappiness when the event comes. On the other hand if we were to live that event in the moment without having a preconceived notion of whether it would be good or bad, we would be able to enjoy it has a unique experience with no false understanding of reality.
Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
David Pizarro: The strange politics of disgust
Yeah sorry I didn't mean to say that it was completely irrational, but I mean the belief is not the direct product of rationality, meaning one does not normally, left to ones own devices, happen upon current religious beliefs, but I definitely agree that religion can be rationalized a posteriori.
Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
Debate: Should students rely on technology for their homework?
I think the problem, as in any generation with advancing technology, is not whether or not we should be using the technology but whether we understand the technology and are using it with care. In one sense technology can lead us to simplify and organize the base level trudge through simple arithmetic and computation and research to achieve more complex solutions to problems, however without being careful technology can also lead us to dependence on quick answers and instant gratification which, in a situation where technology is not readily accessible, may lead one to feel lost or anxious (or lead one to assume disorders like ADD). I think we can not depend on technology solely as a means to make all decisions nor should we completely reject technology and view it as some evil. We must learn to look critically at our use of technology while also appreciating a beauty and possibilities which it provides.
Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
David Pizarro: The strange politics of disgust
I really like your point about the difference in understanding of a subject that we either regard as disgusting or frightening. It's almost like disgust is some sort of gap filler in our judgment processor that allows us to jump to conclusions about vague groups to save us from the potentially fatal hazard of choosing (eating, or touching, etc.) something. If our primitive selves went around in the forest without distinguishing some things as disgusting and others as not, then we would surely die much sooner than otherwise (maybe this is also true with the attractive people response). Do you think you can also apply your analysis on the opposite end of the spectrum dealing with infatuation? For example, love at first sight and religious idolization. Where love at first sight is also this immediate physiological response to the completely unknown (like fear) and idolatry (in the same way as disgust) is an effect of believing that we know without any rational foundation. I also agree that TED is a fantastic tool for procrastination.
Noface
Reese Kolar
Posted over 1 year ago
David Pizarro: The strange politics of disgust
Hi Marcus, I was also having some of the same thoughts concerning the cause of disgust sensitivity. I think it would be interesting to compare educational quality of countries to the level of disgust sensitivity. I do have a belief that having more knowledge of you subject would significantly decrease this sensitivity (although not completely eliminate it as I am sure there will always be some evolutionary automatic response), in the extreme sense when I scientist who deals something "disgusting" on a daily basis, say a doctor, or someone who studies feces, etc... these people may even find their subject to be beautiful and not disgusting at all.