DELETE MY ACCOUNT

Cincinnati, OH, United States

About DELETE

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I'm passionate about

Death, dying, visions of mortality

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Noface
DELETE MY ACCOUNT
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is love a rational process?
Love is not a rational process. When you love somebody and you stop to actually think about it, I'm sure that you will find something about them (if not everything) that will make you go "huh, I wouldn't have expected to love that." Love is a powerful state of mind that produces emotions that can't be easily controlled. It is not a rational state of mind and I am in disbelief that anyone could think otherwise. If you believe that you "love" someone, you are willing to put yourself through physical and emotional stress to keep the relationship going. You become willing to do a lot of things that you otherwise wouldn't have considered because the person you love becomes a very important aspect in your life that you fight to preserve. If anything, love is dangerous because it can lead to your own self-destruction. You can believe that somehow it is going to work, keep yourself in an irreparable situation, just because the thought of leaving the thing you love seems so much worse than the present. I feel that when relationships (when the people are truly in love) encounter an obstacle, it can be very serious. If someone is completely in love and in hurt, they become like a drowning victim. The other partner tries to help them, but the victim just pulls them down with them. People can be hurt in love because you don't fully grasp what you are doing until it is too late. But people can also feel an overwhelming joy, something that cannot be compared to any other feeling in the world. When studies show that the brain acts as if it were on drugs during love this is IMPORTANT, people. Addiction is not a rational process and neither is love.
Noface
DELETE MY ACCOUNT
Posted almost 3 years ago
Debate: Can non-standard monogamous relationships work?
What about long-distance relationships? I would consider them non-standard. I have been in a long-distance relationship for almost a year now. We are on two different continents. And from all that I know, we feel very deeply and mutually about each other. Our relationship suffers, though, because being able to be physically near your significant other is something I didn't realize was something that I took for granted so much. Since we have entered our relationship, I believed that it could be something I could easily manage, since we have talked about making sacrifices and moving to be with each other. But despite all of the reassurances, long distance relationships are not at all like standard monogamous relationships. You feel as if you are constantly putting stress on a person and that they are not able to fill their own needs (sex, and physical interaction in general) because you expect them to be committed to only you. After a while, you begin to question how faithful they are to you. And then you start thinking about deviating, yourself. It's very hard to have a deep sense of trust when you are thousands of miles away and you are both only HUMANS. Not all relationships require trust. I feel that trust, at least for me, is only significant if I can see the person in my life long-term. I'm not that concerned with what everyone else does, especially not in casual relationships. In casual relationships, I can tolerate "cheating." But to me, it's unacceptable for this to occur in a committed relationship. Also, something else worth thinking about: people are usually either slightly more monogamous or polygamous and you must create your trust based off of these observations of your relationship. Every relationship you create with a new person should reflect the dynamic of the individual situation.