Fritz Kropfreiter

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Fritz Kropfreiter
Posted almost 2 years ago
Is Faith inherently irrational?
Faith is not, inherently, irrational. Even the dogmatic faith of our long dead ancestors was rational in that it allowed a social cohesion based on shared beliefs. Insofar as proscriptive faith continues to maintain the delusions of its adherents it is very rational. Logical, on the other hand, not so much. In the arena of logic, religious faith fails on the fallacy of false premise in much the same way. The Inquisition failed because it started with the premise that witches existed. The remainder of this sorry period in European history follows from subsequent arguments, "IF there are witches, then . . ." In the same way, religious faith flows from the premise that there is a god. "IF there is a god, then . . ." and all of the rules and beliefs and exclusions flow in logical consequence from the initial unverifiable (though not necessarily false because it is unprovable) premise. So, "Is faith rational?" Yes, since it arises from and through reason. "Is it logical?" Not by a metaphysical mile.
Noface
Fritz Kropfreiter
Posted almost 2 years ago
Is Faith inherently irrational?
I've come into this a bit late but have always found the concept of faith intriguing so am anxious to comment or throw in my own two 'sense' worth. Faith, in it's contentious manifestation as an expression of the tenets of one's belief system, is a sine qua non of organized (and even disorganized) religion. It is undeniable in the same way that anything that can not be DISproven is undeniable. If I have faith that I can jump out of a 50 story building in my birthday suit and survive then, no matter what evidence there might be to an unfortunate reality, my faith itself is undeniable. That faith may be seriously undermined when my tootsies come in contact with the pavement but the rest will happen so quickly that I won't get past the 'denial' stage of grief before my mind is too fragmented to consider faith, betrayal, stupidity, pain, or oblivion. An earlier comment expressed the opinion that faith in a god is different from faith that the sun will come up in the morning. That gets at the essence of what I am trying to say: they may FEEL different but, in their essence they are the same. It is possible that I will get up one morning and find that the Earth has stopped spinning or that the Sun has disappeared in a giant supernova. Not likely, because all sorts of other things would precede my startling realization. But possible. I might also wake up one morning and find a god smiling benignly form the foot of my bed. Less likely than the previous scenario because the evolution of my paradigms about metaphysics preclude such a reassuring breakfast surprise. Put possible. I give more credence to the Sun episode because scientists tell me that suns have gone nova before whereas only long dead religious zealots have told me about seeing a god. I have more faith in science than magic, I guess. BTW, how is belief in gods and saints different from belief in aliens? Just wondering.