Jamie Cullen

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Jamie Cullen
Posted almost 3 years ago
Atheism: why do people don't believe in God?
I ran out of space there oops. As predicted, I was starting to get waffly! I have lots of other little things about the idea of God and religion that irk me a little, but I feel if I keep going I'll get too far away from addressing your question. Can everything that happens on Earth happen by chance? I don't know. I'm fine with the idea of life having developed by chance, and think it makes more sense to believe that than to invent an answer so as to avoid uncertainty, i.e. God. What has happened here, I feel, is humans, as opposed to all other life on Earth that we know of, have developed big brains and begun to question their existence. The easy thing to do, is to say that there is a creator, a reason, a 'purpose', and all the mystery and wonder and uncertainty is gone. I think that when everything is taken in perspective, the more honest and defensible and, dare I say it, the more daring thing to do is to put oneself out there and say, "There's no reason to invent a God. I am brave enough to stand upon the precipice of my own existence, to answer to myself, to take the uncertainty and the drama and the harshness, to take this burdensome, glorious and beautiful thing that is life and bleed and love and die in all its brief fury." To imply that beauty can be appreciated and worth be gotten from life only when one is living for God, with a belief in God, is insulting. It's insulting to me, to animals, to the universe even. Take animals for example. They never contemplate their existence, so thereby have no reason to live? Have you seen the joy of a dog chasing a ball, a lion chasing a zebra, an eagle in flight above the highest mountain? There is beauty in the universe, and that beauty continues to exist in and of itself, in life, in rocks and molecules and empty space and all that there is, regardless of the pace at which it moves, regardless of the observer or lack of an observer, regardless of the existence or non-existence of god(s).
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Jamie Cullen
Posted almost 3 years ago
Atheism: why do people don't believe in God?
Your question seems quite genuine Arthur so I'll try my best to give you my reasons for being an atheist, in as simple and honest and non-contrived a manner as I can manage. I went to a Catholic primary school, tried my best to believe it and did my confirmation and all those things, said my prayers, told myself God was listening and all of that. I was always a little unsure of it and had my suspicions but at 6 or 7 my simple answer to these doubts was to give it a good shot and if it was all true and correct I'd feel it. I never had a big epiphany type moment, and I was at least a bit scared when I was moving away from religion because of course we were told that it gives our life its purpose and beauty and whatnot. I have always been very logical and questioning though, and my questions and my doubting eventually lead me to not believe in any God or gods or spirit, and I'm happy to be here. I suppose to answer your question this is the part where you'll be wanting my reasons for this, so here goes. I have a feeling I'm going to have difficulty being succint and clear here but I'll try. 1. There are so many different religions, with so many different beliefs and gods and customs, they can't all be correct in asserting their god(s) and customs as the correct ones. It seems equally unlikely that just one is correct, and the others all wrong. 2. The fact that most religions attribute some special importance to humans for me is enough reason to conclude that they are simply a product of human invention and have no relation to truth or reality. Perspective is important here to understand my point: humans have been around for roughly 1/1500 the time that the Earth has been around. Yet, in most religions their image of god bears some resemblance to a human? Why not a single-cell organism of some kind? To me this seems ludicrous and almost upsettingly anthropocentric, and at the same time a clear indication that God is an invention of ours.