Deborah Turner

Psychologist
Bath, NY, United States

About Deborah

Languages

English

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Deborah Turner
Posted almost 2 years ago
Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?
An excellent talk. The information related to teenagers and sleep reinforced for me how ridiculous it is to expect high school students to be seated at their desks and ready to go at 7:30 am as they are here. This is a rural area, and that schedule seems to be tied to some past time when everyone was farming, and they haven't had the sense to change it.
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Deborah Turner
Posted almost 2 years ago
Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?
I agree with Maximilian The articles he has published will provide information regarding the statistics. As you note, since "correlation does not imply causation" is one of the first things learned in Introduction to Statistics, I'm pretty sure to get his research published he had to go beyond running a correlational analysis and provide some basis for making causational claims. I think the talk provides a good introduction to very important information about sleep for the general public. With limited time, many questions can't be addressed, but it does inspire one to explore further.
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Deborah Turner
Posted almost 2 years ago
Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?
I believe the emphasis was on "sleeping" not "at night." He describes the positive effects on creativity as a function of what happens during sleep, not when that sleep takes place. He does point out that people vary in regard to the time of day they feel the most alert and productive. I think he would describe getting ten hours of good sleep on a regular basis as likely to have a positive effect on creativity.
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Deborah Turner
Posted over 2 years ago
Social Equality? So share the expenses of the wealthy, too.
"The poor should get a share of the wealth without a share of the risk" What exactly is the risk to which you refer? If you have nothing, or perhaps are in the position of having something, that something being the means (e.g. a minimum wage job) to barely sustain yourself and your family, what exactly would you suggest that they risk? By the way, Bill Gates DOES give millions and millions to charitable causes. Maybe he gets something that you don't. If you have a high school education, (and don't tell me you think that everyone is college material) try living on your wages from Walmart. First of all they will not give you a full time job so that they don't have to give you benefits. Are you aware that most employees of WalMart are paid so badly that they qualify for government assistance in the form of Medicaid and Food Stamps that cost hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars? Basically that means that your taxes and mine are subsidizing WalMart so that their stockholders can make lots of profit. There are only three choices here. Either something forces WalMart to treat their employees better, or we continue to use tax dollars to subsidize their profits, or we have a whole lot more people who are hungry, homeless, and sick, even though they are willing to work....Think of how well that worked in France before the revolution.
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Deborah Turner
Posted over 2 years ago
Wingham Rowan: A new kind of job market
Those who are commenting on the problems of government running this market seem to have misunderstood what he is describing. He used the lottery as an example because the government just sets up the rules and the database but the market runs through private enterprise. As the comment below states, the market for substitute teachers operates very well this way. A database holds the credentials of qualified individuals who are available and want work. The school goes to that database, and selects a substitute teacher to call. In the case of the markets he is talking about, an issue that could be problematic would be how a person was defined as being qualified. If government approved that individuals could authorize access to various records because they wanted to be part of a database, the records available could include DMV and arrest records, etc. so that a person can prove that they don't have any negative records in that area. Certifications and licenses to do particular jobs can be in the database as well. For example, if one has completed a Child Care Training course, that could be accessed. The idea has potential as it could help people connect with jobs. With the kind of jobs he is talking about, however, it would be most effective in fairly densely populated areas where there can be a large enough pool of jobs and people who want them on a very flexible basis.