Alexander Klar

Graphic Designer , EIN---AUS
Möhnesee, Germany

About Alexander

Bio

Born and since then living in several places within Germany, sometimes being on travel – and even then in awe of the world

Languages

English, German

Areas of Expertise

Graphic Design

An idea worth spreading

A knowledge cloud consisting of encyclopedic entries using a dense web of links and being accessible via a human-like "question and answer" communication.

I'm passionate about

reality, music, exploration, riddles and solutions, new riddles with no solutions

Talk to me about

cognition, language, communication, design, user interfaces

People don't know I'm good at

writing and constructive art

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

254695
Alexander Klar
Posted 5 months ago
Hans and Ola Rosling: How not to be ignorant about the world
Of course that's a very complex topic and a good one for a long and diverse discussion. My own interpretation is that the increase of income in the segment the Roslings are concentrating on in their talk is marginal, because the meaningful differences aren't between the low income and the moderate income (the two humps in their diagram), but between the mass of the people (literally 99%) when compared to the 1% of the richest people. A current study done by Oxfam, based on numbers by Credit Suisse, forecasts that by the end of this year that 1% of people will own more of the wealth in the world than the rest of humanity. Or to put it differently: the wealth (the goods, infrastructure etc.) that we as a whole (including our ancestors) have produced, will be – in half – in the hands of 1% of us. Since we cannot imagine such high concentration, Oxfam uses a different comparison: as of now the eighty richest people – in numbers: 80 persons – own more than the 3,500,000,000 people (half the world's population) on the other end of the scale. One year ago these figures were 85 people vs. 3,500,000,000 people. So the tendency is clear. In my opinion the mechanics of our current political (i.e. taxation) and economic (i.e. the financial market) systems both result in the concentration of power and money in the hands of fewer and fewer people.
254695
Alexander Klar
Posted 5 months ago
Hans and Ola Rosling: How not to be ignorant about the world
Hi Nomenclatura, I have used the graph the Rosling's are using in their talk and merely changed the scale of the x-axis. If you want to look into the sources of the videos I linked to, you can find their links here: http://youtu.be/BhZ7cUFGDGc?t=6m23s ... and here: http://therules.org/inequality-video-fact-sheet/ The source of the Guardian article can be found here: http://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/bp-working-for-few-political-capture-economic-inequality-200114-summ-en.pdf But Oxfam published an update to their study just recently. There it states that within this year the 1% of the richest people will come to own more wealth than the other 99% of humanity, see here: http://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/wealth-having-it-all-and-wanting-more-338125
254695
Alexander Klar
Posted 5 months ago
Hans and Ola Rosling: How not to be ignorant about the world
Thank you for your comment and the great video link, Jessica! I guess it looks similar all over the world. I was wondering and found this great video of a global view: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWSxzjyMNpU According to Oxfam (based on a report by Credit Suisse) the concentration has grown since the video was made: the 85 richest people on earth own as much as 3.5 billion people (half of the world's population) now: http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/jan/20/oxfam-85-richest-people-half-of-the-world
254695
Alexander Klar
Posted 6 months ago
Hans and Ola Rosling: How not to be ignorant about the world
Mr. Rosling and Mr. Rosling, thanks once again for a compelling insight into the world's status and trends. Unfortunately this time I passionately disagree with your chart of the camel and the dromedar – mainly because of three reasons: 1. Your chart skews the real situation by using a logarithmic scale. Once you re-scale it to absolute figures one can see that not much has changed. The income distribution looks like a rat and has looked that way for the past decades. The greatest part of humans have low or very low income (the rat's head) and a small percentage have high income up to very, very high income (the rat's tail). 2. Income doesn't say a lot, when you ignore wealth; if you look at the wealth distribution (see link at the bottom) the growing inequality is easily seen. 3. The air plane ticket is a bad example since air plane tickets have gotten way cheaper over the past decades. Using this as an example of growing wealth only increases the effects of inflation that you apparently haven't taken into account either. Please have a look at wealth distribution. There you can see that – by far – things are not getting better, they escalate, see this fine video of the situation in the US alone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhZ7cUFGDGc