Jake Maddox

Field Service Engineer
Aurora, CO, United States

About Jake

Languages

English, Spanish

Comments & conversations

168247
Jake Maddox
Posted 12 months ago
Is it possible to have a sense of justice without governments or religions telling us right from wrong
I think trying to define what is right and what is wrong is the first problem. Just look at our own country and how divided it is on politics. Each party believes they are right. I think that right or wrong can boil down to what is considered human or conversely inhuman. This can vary greatly depending upon situational circumstances of the human(s) in question. I believe that humans living in conditions that are difficult for survival will ultimately make choices and decisions based on their own survival needs. A person in this case will often make decisions that are considered wrong in our society, such as lie, steal, or even kill. To this person, showing empathy or compassion may even be detrimental to their own survival, in fact, these natural and best of our human emotions may have left the person entirely. Humans living in prospering communities that support and rely on each other for survival may have a tendency to develop more of those "caring" emotions, and because the pressure for survival is minimal, the mind can suppress the more animalistic, archaic survival emotions. So I think right and wrong is a social viewpoint, not one that is innately human. We learn from a young age what is socially right and wrong. We learn from our environment, friends, school, parents, television, etc. So I think that what is considered just will vary greatly from person to person. Possessing a bottle of alcohol during the prohibition would see you jail time, but now it's ok to purchase a barrel. I live in Colorado and a year ago to possess marijuana would get you in jail, now you can purchase/possess it legally. So ultimately we have to do as our laws dictate, but that doesn't mean that they are always correct. Every person has their own moral compass. Just go with what it's telling you, because it's most likely just a product of the sum of your life experiences anyhow.
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
Global Warming Caused by Human Impact is Negligible
Yeah you're right Brian, if not paranoia, what else would be as effective at pushing change? Doubtful anything. Climate has changed this rapidly in the past. At the end of the LGM (last glacial maximum) the earth was warming significantly. The ice free corridor had opened up in Beringia and humans were taking advantage of the warm weather and bountiful fauna, expanding into new lands. Then around 13000 years ago, the climate cooled very rapidly. Within a matter of a few decades, the earth had returned to an ice age which lasted for 1000 years. This event is known as the Younger Dryas Period, and was thought to have been caused when Lake Agassiz flooded the Atlantic through Hudson Bay, disrupting the salinity levels which affected ocean currents. So climate change can and has changed rapidly through natural processes.
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
Global Warming Caused by Human Impact is Negligible
Ice Age at 2000ppm - There was an ice age in the Carboniferous Peroid at 2000ppm circa 450 million years ago. Even one in the late Ordovician Period around 4000ppm. Clearly other factors regulate glabal temperature besides CO2 levels. http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2012/05/31/ice-age-at-2000-ppm-co2/ ANDRILL Provides Insight - This drill is sitting on the McMurdo Ice Shelf and bores through the ice and sea water to recover core samples from the sea floor. The cores are layered, revealing sections of rocky deposits, followed by sediment layers, and back to rocky, and so on. These rocky layers are formed when the ice shelf is present, as rocks carried by the glaciers melt off the ice and are deposited on the sea floor. Layers of fine sediment indicate no glacial shelf was present. These periods coincide with the Milankovitch Cycles and according to the data, the glacial ice at this site must completely melt away in order to reach previous interglacial periods (I should mention that we are in an interglacial peroid now and should still have 10,000 years or so before cooling should begin). http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2007-07-03/news/0707030116_1_antarctic-geological-drilling-project-andrill-biggest-scientific-undertakings Sea Levels Higher Than Today in Past InterGlacial Periods - Shows that we still have some melting to do. http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs2-00/ So I think people should understand that the earth is in a natural state of warming. As I have said, we should reduce our dependancy on fossil fuels, not only because of air pollution and possible climate effects of prolonged heavy burning, but because it's not sustainable. We humans have roughly 250,000 more mouths to feed on a daily basis, so population increase will demand huge amounts of energy, in as little as 25 years. Humans will find a way to adapt to changing earth climates and temperatures. A .01 percent increase (100ppm) in atmospheric CO2 levels will not drive us to extinction.
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
Global Warming Caused by Human Impact is Negligible
So here are some technical papers, research, and articles to help validate my opinion. Milankovitch Cycles - This Information is a good demonstration of how the earth's climate is very dynamic, moving from glacial periods to interglacial periods and back again. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milankovitch_cycles Laurentide Ice Sheet - This will give you an idea of just how much glacial ice has melted since the end of the Younger Dryas period circa 15,000 years ago. Glacial ice has been melting and is continuing to melt. http://polarmet.osu.edu/PolarMet/paleonwp.html Albedo Effect - There is evidence to support that deglaciation is happening faster now than before the industrial revolution, which many point to increasing CO2. Although CO2 is no doubt a factor, the albedo effect may be a more influencial force on the warming climate. http://www.universetoday.com/39937/albedo-effect/ CO2 Lags Temperature, Not Leads - So yes CO2 is a greenhouse gas and thus does contribute to warming, question is how much. Historically, whenever earth's temperatures have risen, so has CO2, however CO2 lags temperature. Interesting. So the earth also releases CO2 gas, not just humans? http://wattsupwiththat.com/2012/07/23/new-research-in-antarctica-shows-co2-follows-temperature-by-a-few-hundred-years-at-most/ New Evidence Reveals CO2 Levels at 425ppm circa 12,750 Years Ago - We're currently at 390ppm, which is 100ppm higher than we typically see for an interglacial period, at least as far as the ice records reveal, about 800,000 years. But looks as though there were peroids without human impact that may have been just as high as today. http://hockeyschtick.blogspot.com/2013/03/new-paper-finds-co2-levels-were-higher.html
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
Global Warming Caused by Human Impact is Negligible
I might do that Mitch when I have some time. What I've come to learn though is that once people hold a position or opinion, it is very difficult to change their views, even with abounding evidence. They'll always find away to discredit it. Like those strong in religious faith that deny the validity of carbon dating and all other sciences for that matter.
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
Global Warming Caused by Human Impact is Negligible
I'm not questioning the scientific method, I'm questioning the variables and controls used. Sure, it is a known fact that CO2 is a greenhouse gas, nobody is disputing that. However, it's the predictions regarding it's global impact that myself and many other scientist question. It's like knowing what happens inside the singularity of a super-massive black hole. There are missing variables and scientist draw the best conclusions based on the information available. That's why there are many hypothesis and possible outcomes. The same is true of our climate. There are many variables when it comes to climate predictions that climatologist are simply guessing at. For me it easy, just look at our past. Look at the earth's history and see what CO2 has done in the past and if life has flourished. Is the earth currently in an abnormally low state of CO2? Answer....yes. One of the lowest levels in earth history. The oceans aren't going to boil because of a .01 percent global atmospheric increase in CO2.
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
What were 5 things you wish you knew as a senior in high school?
So be a sensitive neanderthal! lol! It's true that sex is the driving force in dating, which I didn't mention in my comment to Robert. It's said that women know within the first 10 seconds of meeting you whether or not they would sleep with you. I think men are the same, as shallow as that may be, I believe that it's just how we're pre-wired as humans. There are even TED talks regarding the subject.
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
What were 5 things you wish you knew as a senior in high school?
Hi Robert. Don't worry about your relationship status. It sounds like your IQ and EQ are beyond those of your current grade level anyway, which may indicate that you are simply too mature for most girls your age. Finding those girls with interest beyond Facebook, Twitter, and Justin Beiber will be a challenge for now, but will get easier in time. Most girls of this age group are extremely impressionable and are influenced heavily upon peer pressure. I saw the prettiest girls date the ugliest, most cro-magnon looking guys when I was in high school just because he drove a nice car, was on the football team, or was well respected by his peers through bullying or intimidation. My suggestions on dating are; don't give up, be yourself, know your limitations, take care of your appearance and hygiene, exude confidence (yet not cocky and don't come on too strong), be a good listener, show strength in character (have a backbone), be selfless, be romantic and sincere (chivalry is not dead), and last but not least.... learn to accept rejection positively. :-) As far as five things I wish I knew, only one really comes to mind. I wish I knew that I was truly capable of more, that I did have the ability achieve careers that to some seem out of reach. I'm currently a Field Service Engineer, which I enjoy to an extent and pays fairly good as well. However, I was an accomplished artist in high school, even having a piece displayed in the St. Louis Museum of Art. Even though I loved art and my teachers thought I should pursue a career in art, I didn't see it supporting me. I now find orthodontics or plastic surgery would have been a career path I would have enjoyed thoroughly, as there is artistic value and great attention to detail in that line of work, not to mention it more than pays the bills. :-) It sounds cliche, but you really can do anything that you set your mind to. Best wishes.
168247
Jake Maddox
Posted over 1 year ago
Decisions? Choices? Alternatives? Too little information? Too much information? Just how do we decide? Facing a decision? Share here.
Sadly Juan, 50 billion wouldn't even get us started. :-) I think a large portion of the choices we make every day are the wrong ones, yet we lie to ourselves or ignore the consequences because of the innate propensity we humans have to be governed by our emotions or personal motives. I've made several bad choices already this morning. I took the toll road instead of side roads to work because it was faster instead of saving money, I ate that egg mcmuffin, hashbrown and OJ instead of the bagel, etc. Unfortunatley, this applies to our national-level decision-makers as well. Instead of focusing on issues objectively, politicians are influenced by their party affiliation and voters to make decisions that may not always be the "right" decision.