Mariangela Correa

Sã£O Paulo, Brazil

About Mariangela

Bio

I am a physician trained in Medical Oncology, now working as a private consultant in the scientific community in Brazil.
I am a life long learner, with interests in science, phylosophy, arts, technology, women's and gay rights.

An idea worth spreading

Transparent goverment finances and actions.

I'm passionate about

Asking questions.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Mariangela Correa
Posted about 2 years ago
Lesley Hazleton: The doubt essential to faith
As an atheist, I tended to mix believers and fundamentalists, although knowing that there ought to be a difference between them. I thought that this difference was only one of personal character, but Ms. Hazleton talk has made me see that perhaps the real difference is fear. Fear of doubting. So the faithful may doubt, but the fundamentalist cannot because of this fear.
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Mariangela Correa
Posted about 2 years ago
Ji-Hae Park: The violin, and my dark night of the soul
Dear Keith, I got a very different message from Ji-Hae Park. She was very depressed because she was feeling the pressure to be the best and go beyond, as you say. She only got better from her disease when she understood that trying to live happily was the only possible way to live well. That is her message. Play your life!
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Mariangela Correa
Posted over 2 years ago
Ellen 't Hoen: Pool medical patents, save lives
You mean the variola vaccine guy? Did he make any money out of it? Nowadays it is very hard to come up with something that efficient for a disease...Almost everything that is "simple" has already been discovered... Nevertheless, the billion dollar estimate includes all the researched substances that never make it to the marketing phase. The one that does has to pay for all the others, pun intended! And I totally agree that the big pharmas make way too much money, even when we consider their costs.
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Mariangela Correa
Posted over 2 years ago
Ellen 't Hoen: Pool medical patents, save lives
The development of a new drug, from its first development or discovery, research in cells, animals and then humans, until time to approval and marketing, takes around 10 to 15 years, sometimes more. The total costs are more than 1 billion US$ per marketed drug. This may explain why the patents last so long.