Jeff Johnston

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Jeff Johnston
Posted almost 3 years ago
Should Science be Considered a Religion?
Although I have been a Christian all my life I find that I agree to your perspective on almost all accounts. There is simply too little evidence to prove the existence of a "supreme being". But I find it hard to live with myself when I'm subjected to a life without a grand creator. Perhaps it is because of my Christian Cultural Paradigm, but I find an Atheistic viewpoint to be too similar to pessimism. So I chose at a young age to be optimistic and believe in God regardless of the lack of reason. Since then I have had some rather amazing spiritual experiences that make it easier to return to an optimistic stand point. I still have never found a way to prove my experiences are completely real. They may very well be self-induced revelation, but I can't let myself chose to accept that. My gut tells me to well that I didn't have a minor laps of "crazy". This is why I choose to believe in God. To bring things back to conversation topic. I believe that religion is simply something that helps you choose to be better. Though science in general doesn't provide my "drive" for me to be good. I gain a lot of my ambition due to the things I've learned in psychology and sociology. I don't see a point in making a church out of it. But you can be religious in improving yourself and those around you from the things you learn through science. So long as a group of people are trying to improve the world rather than destroy it - I will respect them in whatever form or organization they decide to call themselves.
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Jeff Johnston
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is there an indispensable person or group in your life with whom you frequently disagree? How has this made you a better person?
My parents divorced at a young age forced me to see my dad as a "bad guy". So naturally I disagree with him often. My dad regained my respect by doing one thing that I find more effective than disagreeing or arguing a potential point and that is this: Play dumb. My Dad knew that as a young man I would not listen to him as a voice of reason no matter how right he was, I would simply try to fix him due to my misconception of his wrongful ways. But he wouldn't take offense! He simply took it and listened to my view (which wasn't always wrong, but mostly). Then he would act as if I had given him some grand revelation and add to it his views (this is when I finally learned from him). He gained my respect and eventually I would go to him for advice. It wasn't until I was preparing for college that he finally let on that he knew more than I did. I learned then that my dad is one of the most brilliant man I've ever met. Since then I have used this tactic in my life. I would ask questions I already knew answers to and learned more than I often expected. I would allow my desire for credibility and respect slide for a moment and gained respect for my peer instead. Then when I would answer or offer a comment later it came with added wisdom and helped with the situation as well. I would suggest a teacher-student discussion is always better than an opponent-opponent discussion. A teacher-student provides an environment of learning, while the other creates a competitive battle with often two losers. The hardest part is being okay with becoming the student of a discussion, rather than the victor of an argument.
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Jeff Johnston
Posted almost 3 years ago
Why do people who have many advantages in life struggle with ongoing happiness whilst others with far less to be happy about are happier?
The main thing to learn from this is that happiness is a choice. We often do things in our life because he think, "that will make me happy" when all we have to do is decide we already are. This seems like a pretty easy principle to grasp until we realize we aren't completely satisfied with "chosen happiness". This is when we learn that what we seek is JOY. What is the difference? Happiness is something decided, Joy is something earned. Joy is something that we fill when we have accomplished something. Why else would we continue to accomplish? Joy is, in my mind, the result of gaining the respect of (though not limited to) a peer. This also helps us understand why we envy those who are famous although we often don't wish to be famous ourselves. But fame, though confused as such, is not the same as respect. Respect is something you can gain from yourself as well as from others.The saying "you cannot love another if you do not love yourself" ties closely to respect and joy. If you do not respect yourself then you will not (or won't feel worthy) of others respect. In conclusion, happiness is not joy. Happiness is a choice while joy is earned. Joy is a result of earning respect. Gaining the respect of those who matter most to us will bring us the most joy. You are the most important person to yourself, so make sure you learn how to respect yourself.