Jake Frackson

Victoria, Bc, Canada

About Jake

Languages

English, French

I'm passionate about

Education systems, philosophy, economics, religion, language

Comments & conversations

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Jake Frackson
Posted over 2 years ago
Shame is a hinderance to education.
I agree that part of a teacher's job is to ensure that a student is aware of their growth and success, but I believe the teacher's job extends further in this area. When a student fails, or rather attempts but does not succeed at something, I believe that it is vital for the teacher to motivate the student to persevere. When this motivation and support is not provided, I believe, shame begins to develop in the student.
167840
Jake Frackson
Posted almost 3 years ago
Aren't Christianity, Judaism and Islam basically the same? How much archaeological evidence is there of similar teachings in the past?
You say God, but to who do you refer? Yahweh, Allah, or the Father of the Trinity? In what do you believe? And subsequently, what is your bias? I have been taught on the subject of Abrahamic religion since I entered middle school and I know all the stories well, so let me reiterate what I said to prevent further misinterpretation. What I was saying is that Allah is dependant on his people. In the Islamic stories, it says that Allah created life but it also sets up the theistic paradigm in such a way that Allah could not exist without his people. Allah is only one half of the equation, he is dependant.
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Jake Frackson
Posted almost 3 years ago
What is the purpose of religion?
Religion has elements that are the same for everybody, for example it does unite (the origin of the word is re, again, and ligare, to tie together). So, you are correct in that religion creates community, but the greater question is for what purpose? To make peace? To create understanding?
167840
Jake Frackson
Posted almost 3 years ago
Aren't Christianity, Judaism and Islam basically the same? How much archaeological evidence is there of similar teachings in the past?
These three religions are based on the same old covenant stories. They are found in the work known as the Old Testament or the Torah (Muslims only view the very first portion of this to be the truth, the Qur'an has an alternate ending). This is the work that establishes Yahweh's (the Abrahamic god of Christians, Jews and Muslims) first covenant. It follows the Suzerain and Vassal treaty but only holds Yahweh accountable. This is the part that ties all three together, however they differ in this: In the Islamic faith they believe that their god, Allah in arabic, is dependant on the Muslim people. Allah needs his people and his people need him. Their doctrines also differ but you can learn more on a simple wikipedia page. In Judaism, Yahweh stands alone. Yahweh is creator of all and is separate from man. Yahweh created man out of his own grace, he is not reliant on his people, but they are reliant on him. In Christianity, a trinity is formed from Yahweh. Yahweh becomes three parts in order to atone for the first covenant (somebody pure must die to atone for the sin): the father (Yahweh), the son (Jesus, or more accurately Yeshua) and the holy spirit or ghost. These three god heads illustrate a different theological dynamic in that God is divine (Yahweh), God is with us (Holy Spirit) and God is our saviour (Jesus). Once again, more can be found out about the technical differences on wikipedia or another source, but theistically, this is a simplified version.
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Jake Frackson
Posted almost 3 years ago
What is the purpose of religion?
@Obey, to summarize you think religion is a means for an end? The end in this instance being answers? Religion is far more complex than that. Faith can give identity, purpose and worldview. Religion is not an out-of-date media for answers. It evolves as we evolve. To restate Ehis' question, what is your definition of religion?
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Jake Frackson
Posted almost 3 years ago
What is the purpose of religion?
Least religious? Those countries call themselves secular but that doesn't mean that religion hasn't evolved into something different in those countries (cult of celebrity, the worship of money, etc.). Possibly they have just found a way to use religious needs in a more beneficial way for the state? "Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature and the opium of the people." Karl Marx I'm not saying I agree with this act ethically, but its plausible.
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Jake Frackson
Posted almost 3 years ago
If we didn't educate students in "batches", how would their social development differ?
I'm glad to see a lot of positive feedback for this question. I'd like to now suggest looking at it from a different angle: In the development of a new born there is a vital time in which he/she needs to learn how to crawl. If the child is moved directly from sitting to standing to walking, they will not be given the opportunity to fully develop those particular motor skills. Do you think this might transfer to education? If a student shows the ability to move on, should we allow them to at their own pace, even if it means that some of the social skills that come with it may not be fully developed (i.e. ability to collaborate, a basic understanding of ethics, etc.)?
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Jake Frackson
Posted almost 3 years ago
If we didn't educate students in "batches", how would their social development differ?
Thanks Fritzie I'll research the topic some more with that. Another follow up question to some of your previous responses, are you basing the effectiveness of these models on the number of students using the opportunity to take higher level or accelerated courses? Also, do you have any opinion on how sociologically these students may be affected by being in these classes?