Lyndall Smith

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Lyndall Smith
Posted almost 3 years ago
What are the arguments for and against philosophy in high school?
It seems the debate has rightfully shifted from teaching philosophy in high schools to teaching philosophy in general, including in lower schools. I pointed out earlier that teaching philosophy in schools requires exceptional teachers. I agree with James McGuiness that the teacher and the teaching process is a critical element in any person’s education. I agree totally, and look forward to hearing more of James on his philosophy of education. It also seems that it’s the educators that need the tenets of philosophy just as much, or even more, than the students do. Maybe teachers should be made to recite the Hippocratic oath that says, “Firstly do no harm”. How many of us have been damaged by an incompetent or poorly-educated teacher, or a poor education system, worse than not being taught at all. It’s those early experiences that set the whole tone of what follows.
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Lyndall Smith
Posted almost 3 years ago
What are the arguments for and against philosophy in high school?
James McGuiness, I’m sorry your philosophy teacher didn’t make a good impression. But students of any discipline need to know where the current world knowledge is at in the field of choice is the basis of a good education; Its partly so people don’t waste their time re-inventing the wheel, and partly to be able to communicate efficiently to others in the same field, and partly as a bit of personal discipline in developing a bit of patience and losing a bit of hubris . I found the whole lot fascinating for a raft of reasons, and wish I had more critical analytical reasoning taught early in my education and less religious indoctrination. But on the other hand the religious indoctrinators were not realising what they were doing, as they themselves didn’t have critical analytical thinking taught to them.
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Lyndall Smith
Posted almost 3 years ago
What are the arguments for and against philosophy in high school?
It seems to me that someone can usefully do some research here. Philosophy was being taught in a few State run primary schools in Queensland Australia, (started at East Brisbane) ten years ago and about six years ago I went to a discussion on its effectiveness; It seemed to be good and very exciting, although I haven’t followed the subject further until now. My recollection is that the teachers are/were a major the limiting factor to wider application. Most primary school teachers are/were not suitable to teach philosophy , as many had wrong ideas themselves. From the replies in this forum, it seems that philosophy is being taught also in some other countries around the world. A review of their results would be very interesting. Additional comments: some students will be very interested in the subject; some/many will not, and their mind set is probably permanent; different individuals respond to different things, so don’t expect widespread excitement; philosophy is not for everyone. I myself love philosophical thinking, but my wife doesn’t get excited by it one iota; But then sport seems a great waste of time and effort, but for many people it’s the light of their life.
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Lyndall Smith
Posted almost 3 years ago
Pam Warhurst: How we can eat our landscapes
I love the idea, but I'm wondering whats happened to all the weeds, the,animals that eat the shoots, leaf fungus diseases, grasshoppers, thrips, mites, fruit fly, worms,, beetles, cabbage moths, root rot, etc etc etc
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Lyndall Smith
Posted almost 3 years ago
Sam Harris: Science can answer moral questions
SH makes many excellent insights that are important in today’s world where uneducated people can do so much harm by their gross ignorance. If we start to dispute the main thrust of what SH says, it sends us along the path where anybody can do anything and escape moral condemnation by claiming their moral authority cannot be disputed. And by what basis can they justify their claim? Answer: rational logic. Can we have someone rationally justify why any religious book can be the basis of moral authority in today’s world? The anchor points of moral authority can only be how much harm or benefit does the action confer on society. In an extremely hostile environment, extreme actions may be warranted to ensure continued existence of the majority; but certainly not in today's world,