Jesse Hepworth

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Jesse Hepworth
Posted 8 months ago
Why does a fast food sandwich taste exactly the same 365 days a year?
It seems that desiring(or at least expecting) consistency would be a very natural instinct. There is consistency in the taste of pretty much every food found in the "wild". If you compare oranges to oranges or apples to apples there is an expectation of consistency. When there is an inconsistency that is a sign that something is not right(it is not ripe, it has spoiled, etc.). You may have an adverse reaction or even die. At best you would likely not get the full benefits you would get if you just ate a different piece. A "demand" for consistency-not just fast food but all food selected for consumption- may very well be ingrained in our DNA.
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Jesse Hepworth
Posted about 2 years ago
Golf Course gardens
I really think this is an interesting idea for enhancing a course(s). My feeling is that it is likely plan that will require baby steps, as I doubt that a golf course would allow a major farming effort to start immediately. I would think that since frequently golf courses are on country clubs which serve high quality(fresh) food, that perhaps their chefs would like to have a garden where they could pick food that day. I would think that that might be the best place to start as way to test/show the idea of a garden co-existing on the golf course. Either that if a course designer could be pitched the idea, they may be willing to design a course around an agricultural theme. With the different crops that are available it could be really interesting and beautiful. And free produce could be a benefit of having a membership. I can foresee a few possible issues. One is that should a ball land in the garden, you would probably have to allow them to play it. But I don’t imagine that that would be a major problem it would just have to be expected that some crops would be damaged by golfers. Another would cultivating the crops get in the way of golf? On a smaller scale it shouldn’t be difficult to overcome, but if the entire course is a “farm” it could be an issue. Lastly, would there be a way in which to have crop growing throughout and still maintain the ascetics that are so important to golf courses.
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Jesse Hepworth
Posted about 2 years ago
Should fast food restaurants accept credit cards?
As far as should restaurants ethically accept credit cards, many people use their credit card throughout the month, when the bill comes they pay it off entirely. If you have a credit card that charges no annual fee and awards airline miles, it is financially more prudent to put your fast food on your credit card than use cash or your debit card. However, if you are financing your fast food, you probably should not. But the onus of is on the consumer to manage their finances. The bigger question I have is how much does “cheap” fast food actually cost when you factor future healthcare costs?
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Jesse Hepworth
Posted about 2 years ago
Books that every citizen of the world should read.
Although you “lol”ed your comment, the Seuss story The Sneetches(The Sneetches and Other Stories) was the first to come too my mind. In fact most of the books that immediately came to my mind were “children’s books”, perhaps a fact will destroy any credibility I might have. I feel that children’s stories can tell you so much about the society from which they originated. They can express the ideals of a culture, as well as the issues that are viewed as societal problems. Not only that they tend to teach things that we all need to be reminded of from time to time. There is also the benefit of the stories being short so people would never think “That’s several hours of my life I‘ll never get back!”. The downside of translation is the elimination of the charm that rhyme adds to many children’s stories.
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Jesse Hepworth
Posted about 2 years ago
Active Noise Cancellation on Sightseeing Helicopters
When I spoke of after market I was meaning that it would be put on the helicopter not the ground. If the speakers were at the point where the sound is being created what is to prevent creating kits that could be used for specific models. I understand that aerospace companies might be the best for creating a system for new crafts, but would it be impossible to retrofit existing fleets. Like how you can get a kit for your car to upgrade the body or the engine and they are not produced by the “auto industry“. I understand that there are many sources of noise from a helicopter, absolute silence while the goal wouldn’t have to be the only acceptable outcome. Wouldn’t some reduction in sound be better than none? Mufflers don’t eliminate all noise pollution but how much louder would the world be without them? Glass boxes? Come on! Passing out earplugs would be the better option in terms of cost/benefit analysis. ;p
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Jesse Hepworth
Posted about 2 years ago
How can one thing be in 2 places at once?
I also like Dr Michio Kaku’s "Strings, Conformal Fields, and M-Theory". M-theory is short for membrane theory, which is the same as brane theory(what it was called the first time I read about it). Essentially it is string theory but with added dimensions… Oops, was I supposed to say “spoiler alert” first?
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Jesse Hepworth
Posted about 2 years ago
Active Noise Cancellation on Sightseeing Helicopters
Would DARPA or private aerospace companies be needed to develop this? Would attaching some sort of aftermarket computer and speaker system be feasible? These sightseeing tours are big businesses and with the threat looming of new restrictions on the amount and hours they can operate it seems like something that could ensure that they still have a business. It would even allow them to grow their business as there are already limits in place. Hot air balloons is a great idea, but would there be a way to make them not so reliant on air currents without creating the same problem of needing a loud propulsion system?
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Jesse Hepworth
Posted about 2 years ago
Delivering a presentation on a controversial topic without labeling the controversy.
I hadn’t given it much thought, but when I read and article on a heated topic I naturally search for the buzzwords that are used by both sides to identify on what side of the issue they fall. I tend to question people who hit all the key terms(either negative or positive) because they clearly are trying to persuade more than inform. Their goal is not to educate but to bring people to their way of thinking. Of course most people ho would take the time to write and publish an article on a hot button issue are doing so not with the sole objective to inform but to bring people to their perspective. Quite some time ago I read an article pointing out that writers who support groups that have a negative image(hate groups) and are strongly on one side of an issue will intentionally avoid the inflammatory language. This is done in order to appear neutral and seemingly giving unbiased information, frequently they will affiliate with or even create organizations that seem open-minded. In doing this they can lure people in to seemingly justified mild prejudicial opinions. In effect these well spoken, intelligent individuals who seem completely respectable are akin to “gateway drugs” to racist and hate groups.