Nathalie Molina

Co-founder, Entrepreneurs@Athena at Barnard College, Athena Center for Leadership Studies
New York, NY, United States

About Nathalie

Bio

Global business expert & entrepreneur on a storytelling hiatus at Columbia University (Playwriting). Formerly, a Senior Director with the world's leading globalization consultancy, today serving as Entrepreneurship advisor for the Athena Center for Leadership Studies at Barnard College.

Languages

French, Quechua, Spanish

Areas of Expertise

Globalization, International Business Strategy, Crowdsourcing, Global Marketing, International Market Research, translation, multiculturalism, Storytelling, Playwriting, entrepreneurship

An idea worth spreading

Stories matter. Storytelling isn't a skill you get at a workshop, it's a way of life.

I'm passionate about

STORY. Inclusion & empowerment of under-served people, cross cultural language gymnastics, assembling groups across geographies & cultures and above all, supporting women-led startups.

Talk to me about

Women entrepreneurs, storytelling, creativity and innovation in the developing world.

People don't know I'm good at

Dancing salsa, taking pictures.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Nathalie Molina
Posted over 3 years ago
Isabel Behncke: Evolution's gift of play, from bonobo apes to humans
Absolutely NO APOLOGY needed! Remember that malcontents are always more vocal than fans. Your background speaks for itself, you are a serious scientist who can afford to do the most challenging thing of all, to make the complex simple. Your style was elegant and perfectly appropriate for the format provided, please do more!
173210
Nathalie Molina
Posted over 3 years ago
Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders
I'd say these are sadly self serving views, women being in the workforce (especially when they're not making it into the leadership ranks) and entering a system that values masculine values and encourages their mastery in order to succeed, is hardly what's needed to have a diversity of values in the workplace (or to change it's shape). Just as the south being full of African slaves hardly made the south a more friendly place for Africans, women being in the workplace (but not in positions of influence) hardly means the workplace is friendly to women.
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Nathalie Molina
Posted over 3 years ago
Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders
I belive her message was intended for those women choosing to stay in the workforce, which she acknowledged was not everyone's choice. Also if business adapts to being more conducive to the needs of all family members (including the men who are co-running the household with their partners), then succeeding in business may no longer require the kind of sacrifices that any good parent would hate to make. I think part of this conversation is refuting some of the sacrifices that have come to be seen as just "part of the deal" if you want to be successful. Women on top should mean the top starts to change it's shape and hue...it will only happen if we get there though, and of course if we get there, we have to be committed to changing it and turning it upside down. :-)
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Nathalie Molina
Posted almost 4 years ago
Zainab Salbi: Women, wartime and the dream of peace
It's not about better/worse, it's about statistical facts and on the ground experience by NGO's around the world who find that a larger % of ever dollar spent on a woman is used to benefit her entire community, than the same dollar invested on a man. Read Kristof, or the bevy of other writers on the subject, this is not news.
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Nathalie Molina
Posted over 5 years ago
Wade Davis: The worldwide web of belief and ritual
To presume isolation and ignorance is an interest leap with which to even begin your commentary. I regularly meet with american executives who seem far more disconnected and ignorant of the world around them than any of these 'ignorants' as you call them.