Stephan Goosen

Pretoria, South Africa

About Stephan

Languages

Afrikaans, English

Comments & conversations

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Stephan Goosen
Posted about 2 years ago
Geoffrey Canada: Our failing schools. Enough is enough!
Wonderful talk! Couldn't agree more! I don't live in America, but here in South Africa, we face much of the same problems. Everytime I listen to talks like these about educations, I can't help but think that we should really, very seriously consider Salman Khan's proposal. His proposal to use video to teach seems to be a very economical way of addressing an enormous chunk of the problems facing education.
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Stephan Goosen
Posted about 2 years ago
Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion
My point about infrastructure, is simple that there are two kinds of problems. Urgent problems, which need to be addressed quickly, and problems that are important, which MUST be addressed eventually. Think of your coming exam, as urgent, and your health as important. Most people, put off the important things like exercise, so they can deal with the urgent deadlines. And, that's okay to a degree. But, if you do it long enough, you wake up one day with a serious health problem that might not be solvable at all. What I'm saying, is that we keep dealing with all the urgent problems, and putting of exercise "for one more day". Then, one day, 20 years later, you wake up with a problem that simply can't be cured, at all. There will always be something that needs to be addressed "right now". But, by creating a life-style of underpaying teachers, we are gradually making teaching less and less attractive, so that it becomes more and more of a "last resort" career. In Japan, teaching is a highly respected, highly paid job. And it's not easy to find employment, because it's such a sought-after job. You have to compete against many intelligent, passionate people. They so revere their teachers that they give them the same honorific that they give to doctors. Now, imagine, if we had given a bigger slice of money to education 50 years ago. We would have a country full with a highly trained, efficient workforce that would be far more capable of fixing the infrastructure and healthcare.
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Stephan Goosen
Posted about 2 years ago
Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion
I find it tragic that teachers are generally so undervalued, especially in western countries. They have arguably the greatest influence on society of any people group. When a country invests in it's children, it's a long term investment, only really giving returns decades later. So, we've decided that we'd rather invest in our own well-being, than the well-being of our children. We have as a collective, have decided that our money should rather be spent on infrastructure or healthcare or security. Because, it never seems "wise" to spend money that might not make a difference in the economy in our generation. Now we sit in a situation where the best, most passionate minds drift off towards other industries.
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Stephan Goosen
Posted about 2 years ago
Robert Gordon: The death of innovation, the end of growth
I think all this discussion is simply to drive home a point that the public just can't seem to grasp: We need to stop spending money we don't have. In many ways, the phenominal growth that we've had over the past century has been money that's been 'borrowed' from this generation. And, it's ludicrous to think we can afford the same spending life-style as our forefathers, when we still have to pay off their tab.
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Stephan Goosen
Posted over 2 years ago
Social Equality? So share the expenses of the wealthy, too.
Sorry, but where did he mention any agency "distributing" wealth. He simple mentioned that he thought those three countries had a healthy wealth distribution. There's a mountain of difference between saying that X is a healthy distribution of wealth, and saying that an agency has to create laws to forcefully redistribute wealth so that it looks like X.
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Stephan Goosen
Posted almost 3 years ago
Sebastian Deterding: What your designs say about you
I don't think that not judging means that you don't have morals or ethics. I think not judging, means that I'm not going to impose my values, morals or ethics onto other people. For example, I value a healthy body more than I value the pleasure that I might get from eating fast food, so for me, it would be immoral to force others to eat unhealthy foods on a regular basis. But, if you value that the pleasure of eating fatty foods more, I'm not going to "judge" you, by saying that your values are wrong. It is entirely plausible that the emotional boost might be more valuable to you than the absence of a few calories. Especially if you're being over stressed at work. So, while I do think it's wrong to impose our own values and morals onto other people, we should be asking questions so that we can be more accurate in how we "value" certain things. For example, let's say that someone wants to censor a blog. His judgement is that the negative effects from slander outweigh the benefits received from freedom of speech. And he is perfectly entitled to that assessment. He might even be right. But, it is through the process of asking these kinds of questions that we refine our own values. But, if we just go through life with the mantra of "not judging anyone, and having no morals", we end going through life making retarded decisions, where we sacrifice priceless things in favor of worthless ones, because we never knew the real value of either. To me, the most classic example of this, is pornography. Which is destroying the lives and marriages around the world of countless potential world-changers, in exchange for a quick buck.