Carl Kravetz

Co-Chair & CEO, Vida y Salud Media Group Inc.
Los Angeles, CA, United States

About Carl

Bio

U.S. born and Mexico bred, Carl J. Kravetz is a multi-faceted entrepreneur with twenty five years experience in the U.S. Hispanic market. He is Co-Chair and CEO of Vida y Salud Media Group Inc., a Los Angeles-based web and print publisher that also develops health content and products for the worldwide Spanish-speaking market. He is a partner in The Living English Company, LLC, which is dedicated to engaging adults in learning through entertainment. He formerly owned Hispanic advertising agency cruz/kravetz:IDEAS, which he founded in 1991. Under Carl’s leadership, cruz/kravetz:IDEAS worked with such world-class companies as Coca Cola, Lincoln Mercury, Kraft Foods, Citibank, Denny’s, The Disney Channel, Fox Cable, El Pollo Loco, H&R Block, mike’s hard lemonade, Absolut, WellPoint and both of Mexico’s largest banks. Carl was also a partner in The Neighborhood LLC, a New York based firm specializing in multicultural education initiatives for the pharmaceutical and health care industries.

Carl is Past Chairman of the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies (AHAA) and Past Chair of the Hispanic Advertising Agencies Foundation (HAAF). He is a past member of the Board of the American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA), co-chaired its Hispanic Committee and served on its Government Relations Committee. Carl authored the AAAA’s “A Client’s Guide to Hispanic Marketing.” He is in great demand as a speaker on multicultural marketing issues and has addressed, among others, the Mexican, European, South African and American advertising associations.

Carl is on the Board of ReSurge International (Mountain View), is a past Chairman of Heal the Bay (Santa Monica) and a past Vice Chair of the Museum of Latin American Art (Long Beach).

Languages

English, Spanish

TED Conference

TED2009

Areas of Expertise

Non-profit management, Language learning, MultiCulturalist, Identity and Values, New Media, Television Executive Producer , health communication, intercultural communication, Web & Internet

An idea worth spreading

Laughter unblocks our capacity to learn and to learn from each other. We should spread laughter across the world. The United Nations should do stand-up. The State Department should have an Under Secretary of Mirth.

I'm passionate about

Language, debate and argumentation, world cultures, design, the environment, access to health care, religious intolerance, food, jazz, primitive art

Comments & conversations

26798
Carl Kravetz
Posted over 3 years ago
Are humans good or bad?
"Good" and "Bad" are human constructs. And they are not necessarily useful since they are not defined the same way by all humans or all human societies. I'd rather think about "Kind" or "Unkind"...
26798
Carl Kravetz
Posted over 3 years ago
As a trilingual or bilingual, what role does language play in the creation of your identity? Which language do you think in?
Hi Pierre, A fascinating response but I assume that you employ logic as well as intuition. I know that I do. Your comment got me thinking about everyday mathematics: For example, it's difficult to shop and make change on intuition alone... And that led me to another realization -- While I am fully bilingual, I always do math in English, the language in which I was taught the subject. Could this mean that my logical facility is greater in English while my intuitive facility is language-agnostic? Is this a core component of my being?
26798
Carl Kravetz
Posted over 3 years ago
As a trilingual or bilingual, what role does language play in the creation of your identity? Which language do you think in?
I grew up bilingual as the son of Americans living in Mexico City. I have spent much of my life in marketing communications, helping U.S. marketers communicate with Spanish-speaking consumers. I have always been intrigued by the way language is an expression of and a source of cultural identity. One example: English is gender-neutral while in Spanish every noun has a male or female gender. It's clear to me that this reflects (and is probably causal to) different world-views. I know that I "function" differently in the U.S. and in Latin America and I feel strongly that my ability to do so is a central part of my identity -- so, yes, growing up bilingual is an integral part of who I am. To add a little texture to another thread above, my dad learned Spanish as an adult and acquired his second language fluently (albeit with a slight Boston accent). In his 70s he had a stroke and lost his Spanish, although his ability to speak English was untouched. It was explained to us that languages acquired after childhood "live" in a different part of the brain than do languages acquired in infancy. Makes me wonder, then, if languages acquired as a baby are influential in building identity while languages learned as an adult are simply additional "knowledge"...