Charles LeRoy

Applicant for Transporter Thingy Apparatus, Starfleet Academy
Brooklyn, NY, United States

About Charles

Bio

I enjoy water: analyzing it, talking to it to affect positive molecular structural behavior, using it to make jello, swimming in it, and further developing my study of covalent and ionic bonding, which definitely supports my theory since 2011 that water should be bottled. When I'm not recording my H2O observations in my water log, I focus my concentration and academic pursuits on time travel. I have an extensive collection of aluminum foil materials, glue sticks, and industrial grade rubber bands that are being slated for eventual use in a DIY-in-the-garage Time Travel Machine. As of this writing, I do not hold any patents for my anticipated DIYITG_TT kit.

And if you haven't guessed it by now, I am universally challenged but I will take the time out my busy finger-painting schedule to attend or conduct a lecture on Michael Faraday, magnetism, and/or superposition.

Languages

French, Klingon

Areas of Expertise

jello, jello molding, mold,mildew, swimming, breast stroke swimm

An idea worth spreading

Neuroscience and evolutionary biology, particularly endocrinology and ethology.

Mini-microwave technology. I think more scientific inquiry and focus should be applied to R&D of pocket-size microwave ovens that run on liquid metal batteries. (Think easy bake-ovens; only with batteries that run for 365 days before requiring a recharge).

String Theory and Quantum Mechanics are serious academic pursuits, which I enjoy discussing over coffee in a box with a cat (see Schrodinger's Cat if you think I'm crazy now). Biochemistry and its application-implications in our modern world also spark great interest if not imagination in my daily routine.

I'm passionate about

Evolutionary biology, biochemistry, neuroscience, solid state chemistry, and microwave oven technology.

Talk to me about

Specifically in order: time travel in theory and application, time travel technology combined with smart phone apps, time travel on a budget, mini-microwave oven technology, mini-frozen burritos.

People don't know I'm good at

Taking simple scientific or technological concepts and, thus nevertheless hither therefore furthermore, making such concepts-ideas too difficult to comprehend at even kindergarten level.

My TED story

Well, I really don't know where to begin "my" story, per se, except to start at the source. My father saw my mother one day, and the idea of a love connection popped into his head and pants, where he coincidentally had a coupon for a buy-one-get-one-free (BOGO) tasty freeze banana royale. They subscribed to the Darwinian natural selection theory and their love connection (i.e. the hook-up) evolved into a sexual relationship, producing me. So it's wonderful to know that a banana treat produced by my father for my mother's enjoyment produced me. That's my TED story. And I'm stickin' with it.

Biology, baby..it's all science.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is intelligent design science and should it be taught in public schools?
I entirely respect your point of view, and you make good points. This was engaging, and I truly hope similar types of rational and productive templates of argument provide better models of discussion for the Intelligent Design community (i.e. in some cases the dogmatic extremists). At the top tier of ID, I think one of their strongest proponents is Stephen Meyer and his Of clues and causes: A methodological interpretation of origin of life studies. However, the teach the controversy approach is still philosophy knocking on the front door of science and that's an illustrative example of muddling fine lines. Very much like the last dtich attempts by World War II kamikaze pilots, the Intelligent Design thrust will not stop until ....well, until they run out of planes. Planes in this case representative of recycled ideas, Watchmaker analogy, etc.
167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Taryn Simon: Photographs of secret sites
Option 1: You can shoot some one or some things with a rifle but the result is destruction of life and property. Option 2: Shoot some one or some things with a camera and the result is preservation of the human spirit and creativity. Taryn Simon's shooting falls in the second option. More importantly, her camera captures visual reality and sheds light on the human condition. But...I don't see (no pun intended) the point in a braille Playboy magazine sans centerfold. Who orders a cheeseburger without cheese?!? That's just wrong, unfortunately :(
167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Jon Ronson: Strange answers to the psychopath test
This is what the talk made me feel: people who think it's only everyone else who is crazy ...they are the truly insane. It's all about mental health management. Yes, tradtionally and stereotypically, the real nut jobs are usually categorized in the schizophrenic, psychopathic and delusional section. However, I contend that everyone is crazy and that's it really about what level(s) a person is at. Can we make progress and achieve anxiety free lifestyles filled with balance, mental stability and happiness? Yes, of course, despite the challenges of modern society and its problems which seem to set us up for failure in early childhood. Our society promotes pharmaceutical solutions to anxiety, stress, and mental disorders rather than prevention or food therapy, per se. Corporate mentality promotes a cyclical system of suffering vis a vis consumerism, fast food and short-term gains rather than progressive vision and environmental accountability. We've become a disposable society and as such it provides an ideal petri dish for mental illneses to procreate, foster, and develop into a curious mixture of freshly squeezed Clcokwork Orange-like culture. What we eat and how we eat affects our mental health. What kind of environment or world we live in affects our biology and ability to adapt to change and illness. How realistically we view ourselves and others have great impact on our ability to seek emotional support and self-soothe. Start at the ground level and give our youth better options. Instead of toy guns and glamorizing war, give our children flowers and explain to them the process and value of life, ecology, biology, and general science without archaic attitudes that flowers, dance, art, and broadway plays somehow make kids gay. Mid-level: teach adolescents and continue mentoring young adults in the value of quality family time over meals (or just sit and drink tea together sharing the events of a day). Promote compassion, tolerance.
167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is intelligent design science and should it be taught in public schools?
I would like to add that I, myself, believe in Darwin's theory. I think the Intel Designer advocates can be extreme and equally narrow-minded in their cause as much as fans of the Richard Dawkins Club. Whatever the case, I just hope neither side is trying to hijack anyone's mind or belief system. Santa Claus may not be real to adults but the power of myth and story hasn't caused innumerable child defects or psychological disorders to children in disturbingly epic proportions. They grow out of it (some sooner, some later) and appreciate imagination and fairy tales as Jungian playgrounds of sort. I believe Intelligent Design advocates will also or at least I hope so.
167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is intelligent design science and should it be taught in public schools?
The picture is not a self-portrait of me in this life but one of my alter-ego, for sure. As Tibetan Buddhist (or how about just a Buddhist or even better...just a man in general) and per practice and free will, I do not believe in a Creator designer (as worded). I believe that evolution is reliable, inspiring so much gratitude and appreciation for the world we live in and all its bounty. It's truly unfortunate that many people miss this focal point. I do think science should be taught just as standalone science in schools unless the class is specifically a scientific-intel design curriculum, which is really delving into the social science or social studies stage. However, I also would like to see Intel Design as another class that would give students an opportunity to challenge both sides of the coin, if you will. Again, science will not suffer and evolution will remain on course if Intel Design advocates pitch their tents on the same academic camp ground. Schools have gay-lesbian-bisexual-homosexual education awareness, and the preliminary worry by anti-gay or homophobic groups was that such programs would (1) turn entire campuses into gay congregational centers, (2) straight students would be brainwashed into gayness, and (3) ideas as absurd as the school mascot and football team switching to pink uniforms and colors etc... What we generally have found is that gay-awareness does this: raise awareness, promote sensitivity and diminish hate crimes by not condoning violence. If a student chooses a gay option it's either an inherent thing or experimentation; not an awareness program. Therefore, the brainwash argument is invalid. And assuming that pink is strictly a gay color or somehow weakens an athletic program is just a reflection of homophobic hysteria. As such, I don't think people should be Intel Designerphobic. I'm not. You either disagree or agree. Whatever the case may be, public schools should be open forums for open debate.
167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Christopher McDougall: Are we born to run?
Yes, indeed. We (human beings) are born to run! Fish excel at synchronized swimming, monkeys rock at swinging, and sloths have perfected sleeping technology. And as such...we homo sapiens are runners. Think about it. I do. I'd like to talk more...but I...gotta run.
167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is intelligent design science and should it be taught in public schools?
Intel Design (ID) should be taught or at the least "discussed" in schools right alongside with evolutionary theory (ET). The focus should be point-counterpoint, comparison-contrast, pro-con, etc. Time can and should be spent arguing about the central issues rather than haggling over definitions and labels. The ultimate goal is to walk away from a rational argument with positive notes that can lead to individual acceptance or denial of ID and ET; not fundamentalist tones of divisiveness that pit camps of opposing theories against each other. I mean, c'mon, don't we already have bipartisanship and politics in general for that? Embracing the negative value of "us versus them" thinking in academic arenas does not advance science, does not promote ID any better than a jalapeno suppository encased in a cooling spearmint capsule designed for pain relief. Let's not be afraid of ID and ET. Let's argue to not argue but to reason and respect perspectives, viewpoints, and rational conceptual framework. It might certainly take some time before everyone agrees that the world is not flat and even more time before society abandons the need to crucify modern Galileos but in the present time let's throw them both in the mix. If an Iguana wants to believe that it can thrive on the North Pole as a car insurance spokeslizard, and a bulimic Elephant believes it can describe three blind men...then let it be so. That's my story and I'm sticking to it until my rocketship lifts off from the studio set where they filmed the moon landing.
167403
Charles LeRoy
Posted almost 3 years ago
Markus Fischer: A robot that flies like a bird
I am looking forward to the day (soon, like in 2013) when consumers can buy a strap-on bird and, thus, save on air fare. I am also not quite sure if the strap-on will come with batteries or be solar powered, whatever is more efficient.