David Conhye

Manchester, United Kingdom

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213795
David Conhye
Posted 6 months ago
Why won't the Global Climate Debate end.
Deforestation greatly affects atmospheric and hydrological cycles, which are intimately a part of our weather systems, as well as soil and land erosion, and the loss of biodiversity, which induce many unforeseen affects. As easy as it may be to conceive, 46-58,000sq miles of forest are still lost annually to this day. Reports can be very misleading, the number of trees cut down may decrease, yet there are still far more cut down than are planted. Also, whilst trees may be planted, they take decades or even centuries to mature and reach the same volume as the forests that are cut down, therefore even if the same surface area was to be replenished, the actual volume would be no where near equivalent. Recent trends aggravate this issue, yet it's also worth considering the vast forests that rapidly declined as people went to war in wooden boats. A single of these wooden ships may have taken literally thousands of elderly trees each, and in places such as around the Mediterranean these forests have never recovered. This has all occurred in a relatively short amount of time. Within a millennia we have deforested far more land than we could hope to replenish in any short amount of time, for a start it takes a long time just for people to become aware of such issues. Many people plant trees across the world, yet often such efforts only prevent the spread of accumulating desertification which has already cost far more than their efforts. Spreading agriculture also continues to greatly impact such amiable endeavours. Imagine if the Earth were one of your lungs and the alveoli, representing the trees, were hacked down by a parasitic organism. This would cause great disturbances, and even if the alveoli were capable of growing back, such an impact would have a rippling effect that comes to surface in time. An absence of trees or tall plants is a characteristic of mass extinctions, ice ages and great floods. They certainly play a large role in the regulation of the climate.
213795
David Conhye
Posted 6 months ago
Why won't the Global Climate Debate end.
I believe deforestation has a profound impact on global weather systems for multiple reasons. The properties of water storage, carbon fixation and oxygen production of trees are vital to the state of the climate. Every year an area the size of Great Britain is deforested. This might not sound like much to you, yet when you drive down every single road in England and imagine how many trees it would actually take to cover the whole surface area, the abundance is hard to even vaguely comprehend. More than 50% of a tree's weight is composed of water, and over an area the size of England the amount of water that is held within these towering organisms is extremely vast. Much of the rest of a tree's mass is carbon, which contributes further to weather systems. Every day an unbelievable amount of water vapour and moisture is released to the air with little to reabsorb it. There is enough water on the Planet to flood all continents, although a large proportion of this is frozen at the poles. Deforestation and a decrease in the volume of ice caps greatly increases the risk of flooding and severe storms across all continents, as well as many other affects which may arise from this situation. Although many people are becoming aware of the scale of this issue, it seems that corporate businesses care more for profits than stable and habitable climates. The demand for wood, and the requirements of space for expanding human habitats and farmland are antagonising this issue further. Again this has a chain-effect since the sharp rise in the number of farm animals has a massive impact on the gaseous composition of the atmosphere. The Earth's climates have always been changing, fluctuating through periods of stability and cataclysm, and humans are certainly contributing to such changes, yet I find content in the thought that despite Earth's turbulent history, life continues to thrive, and will endure the affects of human endeavours to come.
213795
David Conhye
Posted 6 months ago
Let's make "the 1%" irrelevant.
Definitely. Money is the root cause of an incredible abundance and diversity of all problems. I sometimes feel as though a World with no money, and no such concept, would be far better, but then in the present, where an unbelievable number of people have come to depend on such systems, this seems an almost impossible prospect without some sort of catastrophic transition. When you consider it, all money is imaginary. It's a hypothetical concept which fluctuates in its level of value. Only a few centuries ago all the money that we use today never existed, yet it now dominates people's lives, their motives and their feelings. People care more about the acquisition of money than they do about fundamentals of life such as sustenance and nutrition. It even seems that there are some, such as self-indulgent business owners, who are deluded enough in this endeavour to gain money that they place their profits above the quality and longevity of the lives of members of even their own species, whilst perpetually showing no care for their planet in belief that they are somehow superior to all else on it. Although nature will always be far more supreme than any man-made concept or object. I remain contempt knowing that whilst some people have money, I have a finely cultivated mind and a high level of physical aptitude and so on. Everyone has brilliant attributes which they develop throughout life. Money has just become another of these attributes, yet it's a shame that we think of it instead as being the centre of our lives.
213795
David Conhye
Posted 6 months ago
Are excessive standardized state testing practices having an unforeseen negative effect?
Definitely. People should learn for the interest, curiosity and understanding, not merely to pass a test. I find myself that when I learn purely for testing purposes I don't process the information, I just simply repeat what I've been taught without a second thought, alike a robot reciting a piece of work. Whereas when I learn things purely for the interest, curiosity and understanding I find them to be profoundly more insightful, intriguing and inspiring. In my life I have had some teachers who have taught mundanely around the aspect of passing tests, but then I have had other teachers who've had a real passion for their subject and were able to share this passion and teach with great enthusiasm and success. In my experience a good teacher can make you forget about any test and be concerned only with the subject, after all that is all that really matters.
213795
David Conhye
Posted 6 months ago
Let's make "the 1%" irrelevant.
As important as the concept of equality is, I believe it is very much misunderstood. People achieve different results on academic tests, some people can run faster than others, and other people can handle a car with more efficiency. Some people study neurology, whilst others specialise in heart surgery. There are many differences between people, yet do not take this as a statement against equality. Indeed, I believe equality is the means to understanding such differences and using them to progress through co-operation. If everyone were the same, and had the same ideologies, same skills, same weaknesses and so on, then the diversity of human endeavours which stands as the foundation of progression and growth would diminish. Regarding financial systems, if equality were obtainable, they would collapse. Which to my mind would be both good and bad, brilliant, yet catastrophic.
213795
David Conhye
Posted 6 months ago
The Crown of Creation/Crown of Evolution just doesn’t seem to fit our heads. Are we human or are we apes?
Pan sui fallenda suits us perfectly. We believe we are an intelligent species, although the slightest fraction of people could ever actually recreate the technologies that we use as proof of such intelligence. The most brilliant human mind in a dolphin's body would be unable to manipulate fire and electricity, two key principle that are fundamental to the progression of human intelligence. We believe we are superior to all other life-forms and even organise culls. If we could see ourselves as a distinct species there would soon be a call for a cull on humans. Besides this, as heterotrophic animals, we rely upon countless life forms for our sustenance. Self-indulgence, greed and manipulation are common traits of humans. They detrimentally forms illusions of progress. We're a species that decided we somehow rule or own the globe, yet this self-appraisal has led us to greatly inflict our environment. Even now when we are just beginning to understand it, we continue in our habitual ways. Humans as individuals are often very inspiring, rational and well-intended people. However, as a society, where there is no individual focus, we tend to display illogical backwards behaviour.
213795
David Conhye
Posted 6 months ago
How has a TED Talk affected your life?
I think TED is absolutely brilliant. When people describe personal heroes and people of great inspiration in their lives, it is often difficult to truly perceive such people. Yet TED is full of people like this, remarkable people with amazing experiences to share. Watching TED talks has profoundly changed my views and perspectives of life, and massively contributed towards my self-understanding, and the understanding of others. It has influenced my interests far beyond what I could possibly even comprehend ten years ago, and as such in this sense it has been pivotal to my own life. I often try to share an awareness of TED with my friends and close associates, yet it is sometimes hard to describe what it is that specifically makes TED stand out. With such a diverse range of eminent talks and speakers it really is a revolutionary form of education. Many of the speakers at TED make me feel as though humanity is more connected and co-operative. It offers positive and attainable aspects of progress, unprecedented innovations and incredibly insightful views into subjects which were previously believed to be well known, or those which have long been neglected of thought.