Daisuke Kazewa

Bellingham, WA, United States

About Daisuke

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English

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Daisuke Kazewa
Posted about 3 years ago
Joel Burns: A message to gay teens: It gets better
Because of these references to religion, I simply must point out that using that word isn't appropriate.Generally, religions have developed to form morals and community. Religion in itself is not an origin of suffering; it's often an attempt to ease suffering. Many things that religions teach is how to love and respect others. It is institutionalized Abrahamic religion that I've found really hits hard on technicalities, resulting in a group-mindset of hatred and ignorance. However, this is all the more scary for those that do genuinely have faith in God and His teachings. But this behavior isn't at all unusual. "Us" and "them" are the foundations of these group thoughts, and so as a means to identify and commit to the group, these forms of hatred can result. It is this mindset that we are separated somehow, that we are different from each other; these illusory boundaries and walls that we place ourselves in actually limit ourselves and understandings with others. Reminds me of a quote from Robert Frost: "Before I built a wall, I'd ask to know what I was walling in or walling out." Problem is we don't normally. Many people fear the unknown, especially those that are privileged in their societies, because issues of the minorities is a reality that they don't have to know. This applies to virtually all forms of discrimination. [For further emphasis, I recommend Tim Wise's video Pathology of Privilege"]. It is so easy to learn to hate or discriminate. In actuality, getting out of that mindset is much more challenging. But it is what we who see this inequality strive for. Also, with this concept of religion, I simply must point out that homosexuality is seen as a societal issue in cultures regardless of religion. Japan, for instance, has no religious issues with homosexuality whatsoever. However, the fact that homosexuality is not seen as the norm, and may not follow traditional patterns of behaviors that cultures value, that is the issue.
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Daisuke Kazewa
Posted about 3 years ago
How do you think we can motivate young people to perceived and purposeful studying?
One of the questions you ask is "how we can motivate young people...". But we can't. We can show them the door to education, but it is up to them to open it. How do we spark their interest and curiosity? By letting them decide for themselves. Consider a liberal arts-based school system. Students will still have general requirements, but there should be more free realm to explore interests. School should help establish knowledge about the world as well as help give students an idea of what subject(s) they want to immerse themselves in. They can reevaluate themselves over again many times and jump subjects, or stay with a single area. Either way would help the student drastically, to become well rounded and skilled, choosing for themselves what to engage in. "Education is a social process. Education is growth. Education is not a preparation for life; education is life itself." - John Dewey. A big challenge in this is overcoming the values that have been deeply ingrained within us, the social pressures, of how we react to certain disciplines. Just as Ken stated in his video, there is a hierarchy, with arts at the bottom. Even if we did incorporate such a system, those values will still be expressed, and kids will still be socially pressured, especially if they are interested in a discipline lower down in the hierarchy. What we should strive for in our education is for a broadened mind that balances practicality, academic knowledge, technical ability, and we should be able to grasp other perspectives and ways to attack the same issue; "to be able to entertain a thought without [necessarily] accepting it." - Aristotle. Here is an interesting video to consider--"The surprising truth about what motivates us": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_kYOLaHA9g
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Daisuke Kazewa
Posted about 3 years ago
Are there any teens on this site?
I am a 19 year old who only recently came upon this site. Unfortunately though I don't think that I really share the disappointment of being bored, especially when there are so many things to contemplate about and learn about. I don't know how many teens view sites such as this, and though at times it may not feel like very many, there are certainly more than we think. Many people may visit sites and watch videos, perhaps even with some regularity, but not necessarily comment. In fact, that's how I myself was for the most part, for various reasons. I only know of one person that is about my age who watches these videos, and only because I wanted to share a video with him, otherwise I wouldn't have known. I only happened across this forum because I wandered on to "Ken Robinson's claim that school kills creativity" video. I'm very interested in finding ways to improve the current school system in the US or to perhaps enforce an entirely different system altogether. I value learning, and knowledge, and I believe that people can become better overall if we learn the interconnections of all things and learn about countless subjects in interdisciplinary ways. To view subjects as separate and unrelated is a folly. That's just one of the many reasons though that I'm on this site. If you don't mind my asking, outside of boredom, you said that you love this site and it seems to give you satisfaction; why do you think that is? What is it that you hope to accomplish by coming to such a site? Because in doesn't seem to me that it's just a treatment for boredom, though that may be a contributing factor.