Noah Skocilich

Business Systems Analyst, The Active Network, Inc www.active.com
Xi'an, China

About Noah

Languages

Chinese, English, Spanish

An idea worth spreading

The history of the labor movement in the United States in the early 20th century sheds a lot of light on the last two years of popular uprisings around the world.

I'm passionate about

Bettering the conditions of life on earth for all.

Universities

Haverford College

Talk to me about

Peace

Comments & conversations

197226
Noah Skocilich
Posted over 1 year ago
Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?
This is a good talk, and I think says some things that need to be said out loud in American Society in particular and in an academic and intelligent way that cannot be so easily dismissed. I hope this gentleman's research will continue and that it will contribute as much as possible to the evolution of values and social wisdom that is taking place everywhere in the world these years. That said, I also want to offer a bit of criticism that this seems to me to be a bit tailored for the TED bourgeois mentality. That is, after making what should be some pretty hard-hitting points, he then finishes with a kind of feel-good pat on the head to all the wealthy people in audience saying something that seems to me like 'but don't worry, this is all being taken care of so nobody really needs to DO anything or actually consider making any changes in their own life or calling for any serious changes in the structure of our society'. Granted, it's not like it's his responsibility to be a spokesman for Occupy or something, but it seemed like the whole thing was watered down by the way he finished. Because let's be honest, while there may be some encouraging signs in the kinds of wealth for good movements he described, there are still a lot of incredibly wealthy and incredibly harmful individuals in the world who are going to continue right along unless forced to by some a strong social movement. So, yes, if we have a chance to show some feel good movies about poverty to rich people, and if they respond by showing a modicum of humanity for a moment, this is great, but it's no substitute for, and should not in any way be allowed to siphon energy off from the real "low-level" social movements that can bring real positive change.
197226
Noah Skocilich
Posted over 1 year ago
Leslie T. Chang: The voices of China's workers
I enjoyed this talk a lot as a window into the lives of people whose lives would be very difficult for Westerners to know otherwise. I don't know why Ms. Chang had to insert the commentary about Marxism though. It kind of ruined the whole talk for me. Like, made it sound like she also has an agenda to show the world that 'hey, capitalism isn't all that bad...it could be worse...". What do others think about that?
197226
Noah Skocilich
Posted over 1 year ago
Peter van Uhm: Why I chose a gun
If the young woman had sustained her injuries invading the United States rather than Afghanistan, I could agree that her sacrifice was in service of a better world. As it was, it was done in service of dishonesty and greed. Not to say that she didn't think she was doing the right thing, but we all have to be smarter than that now.