John Wilenchik

Phoenix, AZ, United States

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John Wilenchik
Posted about 3 years ago
What if galaxies are "atoms," and stars are "light"?
Galaxies are thought be moving away from the earth at incredible speeds because redshift is attributed to a Doppler shift in waves of light. (This theory originates from Edwin Hubble.) However, if stars behave like "light," then light may actually consist of little "stars," and not be wavelike. (The wave theory of light originates from Christiaan Huygens.) Light may be "corpuscular," like Newton thought. If light is not wavelike, then there may be no evidence for a relationship between redshift and Doppler shift/radial velocity, and galaxies may be stationary. (Redshift may have other causes related to the distance of an emitting body - e.g., a "dying light" theory.) Here is the test: there should be no actual Doppler shift in the spectra of a moving body under laboratory conditions. Because the speeds involved are difficult to reproduce in a lab, we could study the spectra of a celestial body with known orbital mechanics, e.g. one of the other planets in our solar system, with high-resolution spectroscopy. If this theory is correct, then the spectra of a celestial body should not Doppler shift along with its (known) changing radial velocity relative to the earth. Currently, to my knowledge, there has been limited high-resolution spectroscopy done on the planets. (Most of it is done on stars or other bodies with unknown mechanics.)
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John Wilenchik
Posted about 3 years ago
What if galaxies are "atoms," and stars are "light"?
The theory is that stars may behave like "light" to the galaxies, which may behave like "atoms." The corollary is that "light" may consist of little "stars," which may be made of little "atoms." So instead of "turtles all the way down," like Hawking wrote, it's "atoms all the way down." If stars behave like "light," then stars must travel in between galaxies, at a speed relative to galaxies that is comparable to the speed that light travels relative to an atom. In other words, (the "speed" of stars) ~ (size of an atom) / (size of a galaxy) * (speed of light).
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John Wilenchik
Posted about 3 years ago
What if galaxies are "atoms," and stars are "light"?
Absolutely. According to this theory, there must be stars "traveling" in between galaxies. Of course, they are hard to spot, and they would be moving very, very slowly. How slowly? If stars behave like "light" to galaxies, then stars must travel at a speed relative to galaxies comparable to the speed that light travels relative to the atom. In other words, (the speed of stars) ~ (size of an atom) / (size of a galaxy) * (speed of light).