Charlie Davidson

Orange Park, FL, United States

About Charlie

I'm passionate about

At the moment, I'm passionate about getting good grades and writing. Also, figuring out what I want to be passionate about after high school.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Charlie Davidson
Posted about 1 year ago
What is imagination and dream? Are they the same?
Like Robert said, imagination is a conscious thing, and dreaming is not a conscious thing. The two are not related. You imagination requires your consent, as you purposely imagine things and situations, typically that please you. Dreams do not require your consent, and you can't consciously control the influx of dreams in your mind while you are sleeping. Now, if you take the less literal definitions of the words, and instead refer to the definitions used when saying things like, "I dream of a day..." or "I imagine a day..." then the distinction is less apparent, but still simple. In this scenario, a "dream" literally becomes a wish or a longing. The imagining, however, isn't necessarily a wish. It's simply something that you visualize. It could either be bad or good. "I dream of peace" "I dream of war" One is pleasant and one isn't, but both imply that the speaker desires it. "I imagine peace" "I imagine war" Again, one is pleasant and one is not, but neither implies any kind of true opinion on it.
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Charlie Davidson
Posted about 1 year ago
The Myth of the box
This is true. I was merely saying that this metaphor can mean different things to different people. I dispel it all together because it frustrates me, LOL. A thought- If you think outside of the box, aren't you still thinking inside of the box? While thinking outside of the box, aren't you still being selective of what you choose to focus on and limiting yourself to some degree? Your level of willingness to accept things outside of your box is inside your box, right? Once it is something you are absolutely no longer at willing to do, you've stepped completely out of your comfort zone, and... outside of your box? How do we know when we've stepped outside of it?At the slightest inkling of discomfort or at the greatest? I happen to be fine with a bit of discomfort at times. Is this inside my box?
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Charlie Davidson
Posted about 1 year ago
The Myth of the box
You say outside of the box there is just big empty space with zero gravity. If outside of the box there is nothing, then that must mean that inside of the box there is everything we know. By that definition, thinking outside of the box is impossible. It muddles our reality. There is no way of comprehending this outside space, because it embodies what we do not know. If our knowledge consists of the box, then once we gain knowledge it becomes apart of our box. That is why our curiosity is insatiable. We are waiting to gain knowledge that will allow us to step outside of this box, but it is impossible. All that is unknown will remain unknown, because when we learn it, well.. we will know it. (We as in humans) I would say that your revelation that the box was yours was you actually redefining what the box was to you. I think a better question would be, "What's inside the box?" And then we could learn what's outside out it and why we should be thinking out there, and who owns it. Majority of people believe that if you think outside of the box, you're thinking in an individual and unique way. That means inside the box must be an expected and traditional way of thinking. By that definition, everyone (society) that influences your traditional way of thinking created the box. If you own the box and think inside of it, that means outside of it is everything that doesn't consist of you. However, if your box can fluctuate and be modified, as you say, then what is the point of thinking outside of it? It invalidates the metaphor. The box is no longer a box, at that point. It is you. It is you being shaped by your "outside", or everything else you are influenced by. The whole box metaphor is a bit to vague for my taste. Whatever you believe is inside and outside of the box determines who it belongs to. For me, it belongs to no one because I don't associate with this metaphor. I think everywhere that I find it possible to place my thoughts, and there is no box in existence.
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Charlie Davidson
Posted about 1 year ago
A business or some form of movement that portrays teenagers in a realistic way; somewhat like Dove, except for teenagers.
Hi Greg, Sarah's idea was that they would allow normal girls of all body types to model without being photoshopped. Not neccesarily - "Get all overweight models instead of all skinny ones". She's saying that the modeling industry should be well-rounded and diverse, and not limit models to stick-thin girls that have beenphotoshopped. We should sand the sharp edges we've created for beauty so girls can stop beating themselves up over the fact that they aren't beautiful, because they truly are. They should know that and so should everyone else. Besides, if we inspire girls to be both confident and healthy (not just skinny) then that whole overweight situation you mentioned wouldn't be a problem. We need to advocate health first. Health, not beauty. "Perfect" models advocate beauty before health. There are so many girls who develop bulimia because they are spending so much time trying to be beautiful instead of healthy. Everyday models portray realism and truth, while perfect models hide it. I'd say we'd be closer to creating a health movement as well if we had realistic models rather than fake ones, because once Sarah's movement settled in, everyone would be thinking, "I'm beautiful- duh- I want to be healthy as well.." Right now the thought is just, "I could be more beautiful. I could be more healthy." That thought is self-destructive and unproductive. It makes staying healthy seem like a burden and another tool to find flaws within yourself when it should be viewed as life-changing and essential.
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Charlie Davidson
Posted about 1 year ago
A business or some form of movement that portrays teenagers in a realistic way; somewhat like Dove, except for teenagers.
I definitely agree with you on this 100%. I can relate to the low levels of self-confidence you acquire by comparing yourself to ideal images. 2nd grade is when I first started feeling self-conscious about my physical appearance. It was in 2nd grade that I asked my mother if I was ugly. She was shocked, and promptly kissed my forehead and said "No, hon. Never. You are gorgeous." I smiled at her in appreciation, but I knew she was lying. I knew she was lying because I looked nothing like my beautiful cousins or the pretty girls in my class, and because my grandpa never said, "What a gorgeous thing!" to me at family events even though he said it to all my other female kin. For some years in middle school I truly hated my physical appearance, and it really wore me down. Of course, middle school was awkward for everyone, but at the time, I considered it torturous. I didn't talk to many people in fear they'd judge me. I didn't like when others looked at me, and isolated myself in response. I dressed how other people did, even though the apparel was usually uncomfortable and made me miserable. I'm a sophomore now. I dress the way I want. I'm not afraid of people looking at me for too long. I have friends. I was lucky enough that I somehow snapped out of this self-deteriorating phase. (In truth, it was writing that lured me out of it. The confidence I acquired through writing slipped and slid through me, giving me just enough strength to lift my head up and see things other than my "flaws".) Perhaps other girls' confidence levels aren't socially-crippling, but you were right when you said that no girl should feel anything less than perfect. It's as if "perfection" has become mandatory in today's society. A girl should not only feel comfortable being herself, but blessed to be in the body she's been gifted with. I can only imagine how elated I would have felt to see average girls like me being deemed beautiful. I wonder how much sooner I would've transformed.
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Charlie Davidson
Posted about 1 year ago
Can the elderly play an important role in today's society?
Well I find it difficult to narrow it down. I would say an age, but as another commenter pointed out, some elderly people are active until their departure. (My middle-aged father was smoked by elderly contenders in a race once. It was hilarious when he realized he recieved last place.) I typically think of my grandmother, not physically capable, but amazing in mind, deemed overdue by her children who put her in the care facility. She's 81. I wondered what system could we create so that she still impact the future, and then I wondered if maybe it's not a good idea. It's all been speculation though. No solid thoughts have been created yet. Another commenter pointed out this situation applies to young people as well, deemed physically incapable by illnesses and injury. So perhaps in my speculation I latched onto the most prevalent group of people I could find, considering it was exactly them who I had in mind when I hatched the idea. Perhaps this question applies to all disabled persons instead of elderly. I don't know. But then again not all disabled and elderly persons have lack of influence. Maybe we could narrow it way down to those with an "expiration date". Those told by doctors that they have so much time left to live. The point is, how can we make inactive people active again?Should we? Who are the inactive people? I have no clue anymore.