Kyle Sager

CEO, HelioCurrent LLC
Cumming, GA, United States

Someone is shy

Kyle hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

Noface
Kyle Sager
Posted about 2 years ago
David MacKay: A reality check on renewables
There does seem to be at least a mild "spin" in favor nuclear and diminshing renewables. Other commenters observed this here and even major periodicals have posited that David's power requirements may be inflated by more than double. The conversation needs to be broader. Lastly, there is one important factor that he glosses over, especially given his theme: Rooftop solar. I categorically believe that the variety of renewable energy sources will solve our needs. I am also an avid solar advocate. But David's talk revolves around emphasizing how critical AREA is to the entire equation. And he then proceeds to blow past solar as though it "contributes a little but is not nearly enough" while ignoring some unavoidable observations: ALL rooftops represent wasted AREA until they are completely covered with electricity generation capacity. Until they provide power they represent lost AREA. Since the talk is "area intensive" to begin with, much greater analysis is warranted here. How much aggregate rooftop space is available per capita? In a perfect world, if all roofs were powered, what would that mean? What can we expect to happen as efficiencies continue improving? Are there other types of large "non-natural" AREAs that represent additional lost AREA: parking lots, waste water treatment, etc. Is it conceivable that with advanced technology even road surfaces themselves could one day harvest electricity. Again, I reiterate I do percieve that solar is only a piece of the solution; but in a math treatment of area these area factors were wholly dismissed.
Noface
Kyle Sager
Posted about 2 years ago
Has anyone else noticed something strange going on at TED lately?
You can imagine many will harbor a huge combination of mixed feelings over your question. At risk of getting moderated out I will post the link to YouTube for Nick Hanauer's link here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bBx2Y5HhplI >> TED kindly posted that link on YouTube May 17 and the apparent intent was to bifurcate connection to the video. Apparently Chris Anderson (and others??) felt the talk was too partisan-sounding to "endorse" via TED but they still wanted it to circulate once released. I will say that Robert Reich echoes Hanauer's sentiments offered here and Reich also refers to the same idea as "Eccles realization" (Marriner Eccles) in the 1930's (Reich: Supercapitalism) The middle class has been contracting for 30 years or more. Income stratification has certainly increased steadily over more than 3 decades. So the Eccles/Reich/Hanauer notions may be extended to: (1) Middle-class contraction and Upper-class elevation over the course of decades is a policy result, can not possibly reflect meritocracy > The trends are far too broad to reflect meritocracy and (2) If there is no middle class around to buy goods and services, then even upper echelons MUST eventually cannibalize themselves (not just cannibalize the middle class). Seen in this way, the idea is arguably much much broader, much more academic, and not so much partisan. Hanauer believes very fervently about what he is saying; but he is also tacitly acknowledges that both parties have sustained policies that have contracted the middle class over many years. He never says it; but if you're talking about the middle class actually disappearing (which it gradually is); clearly you're talking MUCH bigger than the 2012 elections. The overarching Eccles/Reich/Hanauer theme does make sense to me.
Noface
Kyle Sager
Posted about 2 years ago
Social Renewable business with the help of the MIT battery
Hi Jim: I have neighbors from South Africa (and Swaziland, wife and husband respectively). We are fortunate to have some of the nicest neighbors in the world! I do not know if this helps; but one technology that I read about very recently was a lithium battery by "SolarCity" in San Mateo, California. Cost is around $1,000 per kWh I've read. Basically, the guy that built the Tesla Car started porting the battery technology over to this solar installation company to serve storage needs there. Well: Guess what Elon Musk is oritinally from South Africa! And you never know they might want to find a way to help out! I get the feeling he does care about the planet. You should contact them. http://www.solarcity.com/ . I also found this site for small power: http://barefootpower.com/barefoot-products/powapack/powapack-village-kit-15w but I would not be surprised if you have already seen it! Good luck. kyle sager http://heliocurrent.com PS Elon Musk is chairman at SolarCity. Anybody's guess how much time he spends there. He just launched a rocket with "spaceX" to service the international space station. You South Africans get around! PPS I saw on one video that don sadoway's company is getting a portable unit (waterheater sized) development funded by TOTAL Energy. My only reserved concern is Total could be funding a source to canabalize their own subtantial oil rig investments (if a house battery from solar could eventually start charging cars...will they support their investment??) http://lmbcorporation.com/ I think the liquid metal battery idea is huge. I hope they make it available to places like yours. Maybe contact the Gates Foundation too! They just gave $25 million to Sadoway and they are focused on taking care of poor areas.
Noface
Kyle Sager
Posted about 2 years ago
Should we rely on the grid?
Hi Myles: Great topic! I love the idea of wind because it is both tremendously inexpensive and very very clean! Wind is fantastic. The problem can arise with wind often is that many areas simply do not have enough, and I happen to live in one, Georgia in the United States. I have watched demonstration turbines sit idle here for days on end. Many places are great for wind. This is not one. This is where solar may come in; but I do think it helps answer your question. Solar is perhaps more ubiquitous in that barring areas of excessive cloud cover, it can quite successfully cover electrical needs. Many homes have roof space handy; and the space is often more than enough to cover the home's need if the home faces the right direction. Germany managed to add up to 23 GW aggregate solar in just a few years and generate 3.5% of its power last year from solar - for a population of 80 million. That number is huge and is an important marker for the entire world to note...because Germany lies at a latitude of more than 1,600 kilometers north of where I live! And Australia: Wow! you get some of the greatest sun on the planet! My main point here: Sun tends to be more broadly available than other renewables and despite claims about low sun the United States is having tremendous success with it in places like New York and Chicago. But if you get good wind that is fantastic! Use it!! In my mind, the key is not necessarily getting off grid entirely but in moving toward distributed power. To use another example: in our state we will be adding a 1,200 GW nuclear reactor in 2016. Not my first choice. In order to reach recipiants in Atlanta, that power will need to traverse distances of 200 miles or more which means special infrastructure to cover transmission. The advantage of renewables becomes scalability: pwr sources can be almost as small as you want them to be. Then we redirect infrastructure $ from fat grid to smart grid and share with ea other.