John Albright

Professional Development Specialist
Aurora, IL, United States

About John

Bio

Most of my career has been spent working with troubled youth. I have undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Philosophy, and a Master's Degree in Clinical Psychology. Much of my work has been working in juvenile corrections with at-risk youth and their families. I've worked in both juvenile detention and probation, both as in direct care and as a family therapist for high-risk youth and their families. Currently I provide training for detention center staff on topics such as cognitive-behavioral interventions, development, team-building, and group facilitation. Being a well-rounded individual is important, and for me the means experiencing as much of the world as possible. I try to travel and learn as much as I can (which probably explains why I like TED so much). My wife is a sommelier...we do our best to travel to wine regions whenever we can. We have a fantasy of opening a wine shop together someday. My hobbies are very important to me. They include cycling, exercising, poker, reading, hiking, and traveling.

Areas of Expertise

psychology - clinical, Philosophy

I'm passionate about

I'm passionate about trying new things and having new experiences. Things like traveling, learning, and exercise are important to me. I prefer dynamic and upbeat environments.

Comments & conversations

160365
John Albright
Posted over 2 years ago
What Makes Life Worth While?
I think it's important to find what makes life fun and interesting for you. For me it's traveling and savoring the times I'm experiencing something new and inspiring. That and junior mints...junior mints definitely make life worthwhile.
160365
John Albright
Posted over 2 years ago
Do we Ignore incarcerated men, women and juveniles or help Restore them back into community?
I don't think we "ignore" incarcerated men, women and juveniles, I just think we sometimes use the wrong interventions. My experience in this field has shown my that there are a lot of dedicated and caring individuals who genuinely work hard to make a difference in people's lives. The issue with juveniles in particular is whether or not we are using interventions that are truly evidence-based. The research is pretty clear that incarceration alone does not have significant impact on crimonegenic behavior (it can actually increase it amongst low-risk youth). The most successful interventions are family and community-based interventions because they are more likely to address specific risk factors (Multi-Systemic Therapy, Family Functional Therapy, for instance). I think that the juvenile justice system in the U.S. is coming to realize this and has been moving towards these ends over the past several years (we are seeing the numbers of incarcerated youth decline) however progress has been slow at times. The U.S. justice system has largely been a retributive one for a long time, and the move towards more Restorative-types of interventions, while necessary, are sometimes difficult for people to accept because they don't come off as "tough on crime." It is imperative that organizations remain abreast of current research and come to realize that all of the money being spent on incarceration can better be spent on these more evidence-based interventions.