Tamara Temple

Saint Paul, MN, United States

About Tamara

I'm passionate about

music, technology, science, people, the future, art

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

Noface
Tamara Temple
Posted over 2 years ago
Do you think feminism is becoming a sexist anti-men movement?
Feminism is a movement with no actual leaders. There are people who drive critical thought, and in this case, they might be perceived as leaders, however, feminism does not have anyone who can say "This is what feminism is, in entirety and exclusively". Thus, you'll only really be able to get the personal opinions of whomever you ask. The notion that people's thought, behaviour and speech are or should be controlled by laws just chills me right out. I do not want to live in such a state, nor, do I expect, do you. I am quite sure that I could cast a net and find people who do think that way ("There ought to be a law!" is a common enough meme) until they really sit down and think about that. While I do wish for a society that cares about social justice, and that people's action do not hurt or marginalise groups of people, at the same time I realise this as a practical impossibility; the best I can hope for is that this is generally true, and that individuals think about how their thought, speech and actions will affect others, and that there is more empathy with others. But I could not condone a society that wishes to force it's members along any particular mindset, as that counters exactly what is desired in this case. So in the sense of "legal way" meaning casting more laws upon society, I completely agree with that. Much as it is true that you can't legislate morality, neither can you legislate empathy.
Noface
Tamara Temple
Posted over 2 years ago
Do you think feminism is becoming a sexist anti-men movement?
First off, I wouldn't say "just as *bad*" per se -- generalising from personal experience is just a very human thing to do. We all do it; it's part of how we get by in the world. Recognising it and other cognitive bias is difficult, and in some cases, impossible to do within ourselves. Things are dynamic, although it is easy to fall into the state of seeing them statically as well. And my prejudice is not your prejudice is not their prejudice, etc., just as my feelings of marginalisation are not yours nor theirs either. It is somewhat of a truism that as soon as a person who has felt marginalised because of their sense of identity gets some power, they will go on to press it over others. Yes, things do evolve, critical thought evolves, leaders evolve, masses of people evolve, but that isn't necessarily visible at an individual level. One encounters harsh treatment of one's self from an individual who claims to belong to a particular group that one might have thought would be more compassionate, caring and personally watchful based on their own experience and rhetoric, and it's easy to form opinions. Social change is not monodirectional, either. It goes in all sorts of directions, because all the people in contact with it have slightly different goals. As you term it, prescriptive social movements do seek to alter society to their ends, but as I said above, those individuals making up that group will necessarily have different experiences, different opinions based on that, and different strategies for achieving goals; that they believe they share goals may also be an illusion. "Equality" and "Equal Rights" are actually pretty vague terms when you come down to it, and just because, for example, we may agree we want equal rights for all people, we may, in fact, not agree at all on the details of that. We communicate in generalisations and metaphors, because that is what language is. But we don't necessarily understand the same things out of that.
Noface
Tamara Temple
Posted over 2 years ago
Do you think feminism is becoming a sexist anti-men movement?
To answer the question directly, yes. People like Dawkins, Myers, Obama, Al Franken, Phil Platt, Neil Gaiman, the list goes on. You may not think of them as feminists since they seem notable for other things, nevertheles they are feminists, as well. This tends to exempilfy the general trend that feminism is somehow viewed as something monolithic and single voiced. Look around, you'll find feminists everywhere, while they're also fighting for other causes. I question the point of the question as well. If somehow your view is such that the feminist movement can only be defined by the notion that who comes to your mind are only "notable" people, then you really do not understand this at all.
Noface
Tamara Temple
Posted over 2 years ago
Do you think feminism is becoming a sexist anti-men movement?
To address the question directly, no, I don't believe feminism is becoming sexist or anti-men. Feminism is a hugely complex, multi-hued and quite human concept, and can't even adequately be classed as a 'movement' so much as a collective of disparate experiences, opinions, emotions, needs and desires. From the very beginning, Feminism has had a strong anti-male narrative, where the voices of those who feel hurt by the effects of marginalization were the loudest. So, it's not becoming so; there has been a broadening of voices, however, that seek to provide a humanistic and inclusive perspective. As one's perspective on what feminism will probably necessarily be driven by their personal experience with it, it can appear to be some monolithic endeavour. However, as with all human collective efforts, it is most definitely not. When you say "Most feminists are being sexist", I find that statement problematic from a few different directions. First, how do you quantify "most"? Is this merely the feminists you have encountered so far, or do you have some other measure of this? Secondly, when you say "being sexist" -- this is also quite vague -- what specific behaviour or speech are you attributing under that term? Also, are you referring only to female feminists, or male and other feminists as well? I certainly won't deny that any person could act or speak in a manner that would be construed as sexist, but no one is immune from that. If you are saying that most of body of people who call themselves feminists are being sexist, however, I will take exception to that, merely from the standpoint that you can't know enough of them. Now, I will be the first to admit that Feminism, as a movement, has some very problematic aspects to it. Yes, there has been and continues to be a thread of anti-male discourse and sentiment. There are also many threads that fail people of colour, people with disabilities, and almost any other intersectionality.
Noface
Tamara Temple
Posted over 2 years ago
Do you think feminism is becoming a sexist anti-men movement?
If legal rights were the only feminist issue, you might be right. However feminism address things far beyond merely what is in the laws. Social, commercial, political, personal -- these are still arenas open for change. Laws are possibly the least things that govern our everyday lives. Also, looking at things in a zero-sum game rather automatically leads to a win-lose attitude "If women get anything more, that will take away from me" -- but that is not really the case.
Noface
Tamara Temple
Posted over 2 years ago
Do you think feminism is becoming a sexist anti-men movement?
The problem here, I feel, is labelling and considering a largely global movement based upon personal experiences. Feminism is wide-spread, consists of many people, some of whom will definitely have contradictory opinions about what constitutes feminism, men's role in that, and other aspects. You seem to understand this at least on the surface, yet it seems have allowed such a singular experience drive you away. Pointing out that few things can be stated categorically about men or women seems to be lost when you then cast Feminism into the same pot. I would agree with your experience of your professor being marginalizing, however, if you are arguing to not vilify a group of people based on the actions and speech of a few (or one), is this not the same mistake?