About Julian

Bio

Sound is my passion, and particularly the use, or more often abuse, of sound in business. My vision is to make the world sound beautiful.

I love TED and feel very much part of this community. I have four talks on TED.com, all about sound; the one on conscious listening has been viewed over 1.5 million times, making it the 78th most-watched TED talk of all time. I speak internationally about sound, business and listening on conference platforms, as well as to the media (like TIME Magazine, The Economist, The Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC Radio and TV, many global radio shows and business magazines). And my personal teaching about conscious listening, powerful speaking and using sound for health, success and better relationships is all up now on Udemy.com - just search on my name.

My book Sound Business was the first guide to harnessing the power of intentional, well-designed sound in business, from branding and marketing to the telephone, the web and physical spaces such as shops, restaurants, offices and reception areas.

My company The Sound Agency is dedicated to proving that good sound is good business, which is fortunately true! We do sound audits, run workshops, and create effective sound and soundscapes, specialising in retail soundscapes using evolving generative sound from our Ambifier system. This sound is designed to be aural wallpaper and replace inappropriate music, which is so often wrongly played in public places. I love music; I'm a musician. But there's often a conflict when music is used as a veneer.

Making the world sound beautiful may take some time, but I'm nothing if not stubborn!

Languages

English, Italian

TED Conferences

TED2016, TED2014, TEDGlobal 2013, TED2013, TEDGlobal 2012, TED2012, TEDGlobal 2011, TEDGlobal 2010, TEDGlobal 2009, TED2008, TEDGlobal 2005, TED2005, TED2004

Areas of Expertise

Sound, BrandSound, Sound in business, Soundscapes, Retail and office sound, Conscious listening, Healthy sound

An idea worth spreading

In modern living we have promoted the eyes to rule the senses, and become used to suppressing sound, but it still affects us all. Regaining our conscious listening is a vital task because noise creates ill health (a million years of healthy life lost each year in Europe alone according the WHO) and antisocial behaviour, to name but two consequences. If we teach our children how to listen consciously and mindfully then in a single generation we can transform our world to a place of understanding, compassion and beauty. Now that is a prize worth having.

I'm passionate about

transforming the world's sound and listening, my children, making and listening to music, the Dolomites, consciousness.

Universities

Cambridge

Talk to me about

sound, conscious listening, public speaking, sound and brands, music, voice, language, generative sound, marketing, franchising The Sound Agency, partnerships, TED, Ambifier

People don't know I'm good at

drumming - I've played since I was 15; and golf - when I get time to play at wonderful Sunningdale.

My TED story

I came in 2003 and loved having my brain scrambled by a series of brilliant talks, having permission to go up to and talk to over 1,000 fascinating and extraordinary strangers (that's what the TED pass means, and many of the strangers are now friends) and taking away stuff that changes my life and my work, Next was the inaugural TED Global in Oxford in 2005 because all the Monterey events landed on my daughter's birthday... until 2008, when I was overjoyed to be back and to experience a vintage TED, the last at Monterey. I attend TEDGlobal every year, and am back in the US in 2012 and 2013.. and now TEDActive in 2014. You cannot have too much TED! I'm honoured to have four talks on TED.com, and overwhelmed to reflect that more than six million people have watched them online. TED has been responsible for so much good in my life. I cherish it.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

40426
Julian Treasure
Posted 9 months ago
Julian Treasure: 5 ways to listen better
So true Lynda (and Helen above) - we obsess with SENDING education (how good is the syllabus, how motivated and well trained are the teachers?) and completely forget to consider RECEIVING it (can the children hear and do they know how to listen?). I refer you also to my TED talk on designing with our ears, which talks about the scandal of classroom acoustics.
40426
Julian Treasure
Posted 11 months ago
Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen
Thanks Marcia! I am so glad the Udemy courses are proving valuable to you. I would be delighted to have captions if you know how to do that... please pop by my website and drop me an email so we can talk about that. Sadly I won't be in Rio for TEDGlobal - the first one I've ever missed - because we have a baby due at exactly that time.
40426
Julian Treasure
Posted about 1 year ago
Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen
If anyone wanted to go deeper in this topic we've just had a couple of places open up at my seminar on powerful speaking this Saturday July 5. It's close to London Heathrow airport and has no more than 12 people so I can do lots of coaching. For details pop by my website at juliantreasure.com.
40426
Julian Treasure
Posted about 1 year ago
Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen
Jyoti this talk was about speaking and the habits that either help or hinder us to be heard more clearly. It is not proposing that we be always positive (authenticity means being real, not faking or using a mask). I do agree about the power of listening, which is why I had a whole TED talk about it a couple of years before this one. In both speaking and listening my passion is to help people to be conscious about what they are doing. Perhaps reflect also on the judgement in your listening to my story about my Mum. If you've ever been with someone who is inveterately and constantly negative you would I'm sure agree that it does make it harder to listen to them. Not impossible, just harder. They are not bad or wrong for being like that, but it does have an effect on those around them. And that's what the first part of my talk was about: the cost if these patterns of speaking become unconscious habits. Judging or repressing people with those habits is absolutely the opposite of my point. The aim is simply consciousness in both sides of communication. Please do check my other talk... I think you'll find resonances there.
40426
Julian Treasure
Posted about 1 year ago
Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen
LaRae this talk is not a demand that people be always positive; not is it suggesting that we ignore or refrain from condemning evil. Its heart is a plea for honesty, authenticity, integrity, and love in speaking. The seven sins are simply a list of unconscious habits that tend to make to hard for people to listen when we speak, especially if we practice them continually and without foundation; I'm sure you have met people who complain endlessly about everything. If we see problems and come from HAIL we MUST speak out. This talk is absolutely not a suggestion that we censor speaking out or become mindlessly positive (which would be as hard to listen to as a being mindlessly negative!). But habitual complaining devalues a genuine grievance - the story of the boy who cried wolf comes to mind. In sum, I dearly hope that this talk may help people like you to speak out in power and with greater effect.
40426
Julian Treasure
Posted about 1 year ago
Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen
I so agree and refer you to my TED talk on conscious listening! I want to make a distinction between discernment (which is necessary in all aspects of life and especially listening) and judging (I think I did say judging, not judgment). Judging as I use it here involves also condemnation, and that's the package that I am suggesting makes it hard to listen.