Neil Deatherage

Eugene, OR, United States

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University of Oregon

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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Do zoos help biodiversity conservation?
I wonder what zoo's are started with the mindset of zoology first and turning a profit second? Some zoos seem more notable for exotic entertainment like being able to view rare tigers or being splashed by orca whales. Other zoos seem more about educating the public about our close neighborhood creatures we may not otherwise ever see or experience living an urban 9am to 5pm lifestyle. I believe many animal right groups are against either of these mindsets, but the small price a few animals pay by having smaller living quarters or having to entertain a cheering crowd is worth exposing the public to the wonderful animals living on this planet. While it would be great if all zoos could breed and protect endangered species found throughout this planet, at least they provide a cultural ecosystem service by showing what humans have to lose by continuing to live the way are today.
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
From ivory tower to prison cell: How can we bring conservation efforts to the public?
I think we should be implementing conservation science in the public school system and do it as early as elementary school. I think the skills and practices a society needs can and should be taught at a young age, and it wouldn't have to be a whole separate class students dreaded attending. Instead of requiring whole classes dedicated to conservation science, we could at least teach and implement basic principles of how to lessen our individual impact into all grades and every class. Young elementary students could learn the importance of separating recyclables after lunch and recess, and middle school student could be taught how to conserve food and resources in home economics. I truly believe education at a young age is the answer, and I think if adults and parents pushed the education systems to become more active in teaching children how to save the planet through conservation, we can drastically reduced negative impacts for future generations to come.
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Do extremist tactics push environmentalism forwards or backwards?
http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2005/06/worlds_most_fam/ Just wanted to share this link- an interview with Jeff Luers- the man that set fire to 3 SUV's in Eugene, Oregon back in 2000. He was originally sentenced to 22 years in prison but after many years of appeals was reduced to about 10 years. I wonder how many people living in Eugene in 2000 remember this story, and if his actions made any significant advancements or setbacks for environmentalist locally in Eugene and throughout the United States?
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Do extremist tactics push environmentalism forwards or backwards?
I must say I really like this striptease for trees group what a great idea! I think everyone can agree that sex sells or at the least can distract someone from almost anything. I think a little skin can go much further than tree spikes which may kill someone. You bring up a great point Feyisayo and I can't help but wonder in what other ways could we use sex instead of violence or extreme measures not just to sell cars and 6 packs but to protect the environment!
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Should shark fishing be banned?
I think shark farming would be a great compromise to keep many shark species from becoming extinct while allowing a culture to use shark fins as their parents and grandparents had before them. I feel shark farming COULD discourage many negative practices currently associated with shark finning such a cruel treatment towards the animal and unnecessarily wasting the remains of sharks after de-finning. As with so many other goods once taken off the black market and managed through regulation, shark farming practices could stifle some of the illegal harvesting of fins and bring much needed awareness to the public of the these important nearly extinct animals.
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Should shark fishing be banned?
I was interested to see if any polls had been conducted with cultures that consume shark fins. I had wondered if those that consume shark fins are aware of the inhumane ways fins are harvested, or how the demand for such a product are threatening many shark species to near extinction. While I could not find any polls on public awareness or the impacts of finning, I did find a poll suggesting a increased awareness of finning particularly in younger generations of China. In 2010 an online poll of 1500 soon to be wed Hong Kong residents, 65% chose to remove shark fin soup from their wedding menu, and 76% of those 19 years of age or younger were against fin soup in their wedding as well. While very little can be extrapolated from such a small poll taken in a single year, it would be safe to suggest the younger generation of China is either more aware or becoming increasingly away of the negative impacts associated with the hunting and harvesting of shark fins. Even though growing prosperity in China has increased recent demands for shark fins, it is encouraging that younger Chinese may be putting cultural traditions second to the wellbeing of species facing extinction.
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Should Cannabis be legalized as a medicine?
I would like to thank each and everyone for his/her insight and participation in this TED conversation. It has been with great pleasure reading different perspectives not only from fellow University of Oregon classmates, but perspectives from those throughout the United States and in different countries across the globe. The sheer volume of comments in this discussion suggests this question is going to remain at the forefront of scientific and political debate, with more questions than answers to come as the issue of medicinal cannabis intensifies. Thank you all again very much. Sincerely, Neil Deatherage
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Should Cannabis be legalized as a medicine?
I think what will be interesting to watch over the next decade is how employment, insurance and our government handles cannabis becoming increasingly accepted as a medicine. Most jobs that require drug screening cannot accept cannabis as a medicine, often denying employment. Health insurance companies cover prescription drugs in the hundreds of millions of dollars per year, but have yet to extend coverage with less expensive cannabis alternatives. And when these issues cannot be solved in State Supreme Courts but must be decided in Federal Court? These will be very interesting times for cannabis in the United States..
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Neil Deatherage
Posted almost 2 years ago
Given that chimpanzees are endangered, is it ethical to use them in biomedical research?
While a somewhat egocentrical view (yet speaking for all humans) and undoubtingly sad, I feel it would be unethical not to conduct biomedical research on animals particularly chimpanzees in hopes to treat the possible life threatening disease hepatitis C. Advances in medicine save millions of lives yearly, and many from new drug developments or treatments that could not have come about without biomedical testing. I believe anyone staunchly against this practice would change their opinion rather quickly if they themselves developed or contracted a disease that required biomedical testing- even if the species were in danger of extinction. Yet to play devil's advocate I believe we should also consider this dilemma from the view as soon to be scientists, or even from the view of the chimpanzee! With the chimpanzee species population nearing extinction I feel a fair compromise to please both sides of the argument can be met. While we invest money into curing Hepatitis C, potentially bettering the health of a humans and our society, we should allocate funds and energy to invest in the restoration of theirs. This could include protecting and restoring many of their natural habitats to pre-human interventions while safeguarding the threatened species through controlled propagation in the protected habitats, zoos, and of course in the wild.