Emma Windsor

London Uk, United Kingdom

About Emma

Bio

As a child, I was afraid of the dark.

I’d dread waking to it in the small hours, swinging bare legs over the edge of the bed (well within the grasp of the skeletal hands beneath) and dashing across the carpet to turn on the light. Often however, I’d just lie there. Too scared to move for fear of disturbing those hands that had now crawled along the bed frame and were gently scratching at the corners of my mind. As I grew, so too did my fascination with monsters. I soon learnt that every kindly Dr Jekyll harbours his own sordid Hyde and that the manufacture of beasts is the main staple of those who wish to consume us.

I am inspired by places. I want to explore dusty attics, forest thickets, forgotten pathways and abandoned tube stations. I am drawn to texture. I want to run eyeballs over rusty surfaces, viscid meats and the velveteen of flock wallpaper. I am intrigued by dark themes, by urban myths and cautionary tales, distorted dreams and memento mori. Most of all I am eager to lift the mask, to peer beneath and ponder who really has the sharpest teeth.

I am still afraid of the dark.

Comments & conversations

156783
Emma Windsor
Posted over 3 years ago
Live Q&A with Julian Grey - Combining Animation and Poetry
Blurred indeed. I was intrigued by Collins' statement above in which he considers the marriage of animation and poetry as a long time coming. I consider the lyrical as poetic, therefore to my mind, there's a considerable history of these two art forms in synthesis... But then I'm not a poet! Well, I agree, up to a point... :) My personal feeling is that it is the agenda behind the work is the key consideration... Now, there's nothing wrong at all with the commercial brief, but it doesn't quite have the potential for complete and unfettered self-expression as, of course, the clients' objectives must always be met. They are both very exciting realms, I'm sure you agree - but also quite different to my mind. I'm guessing this brief was a combination of the two - how very exciting :)
156783
Emma Windsor
Posted over 3 years ago
Live Q&A with Julian Grey - Combining Animation and Poetry
Hi Julian. I enjoyed your animated accompaniment to some of Billy Collins' work. 'Budapest' was particularly lovely. I have some questions regarding your feelings toward the synthesis of poetry and animation I would like to ask you if I may... To what extent did you collaborate with Collins? Is the visualisation just a response to the written word or did you have the opportunity to meet with the poet and discuss a visual approach beforehand or..? Immediate parallels can be drawn between the use of animation to accompany poetry and the use of animation in music videos. As the animator, do you feel that there is a difference in how you respond to the lyrical, as opposed to the purely poetic? Last, the work produced via this kind of artistic collaboration is obviously very different to work produced to satisfy a commercial brief. Do you favour a particular approach to creative production...?