Alexa Westerbeck

Eugene, OR, United States

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Comments & conversations

157496
Alexa Westerbeck
Posted about 2 years ago
Do zoos help biodiversity conservation?
This is a good point. If zoos are to play a role in actively conserving species by breeding them in captivity for eventual release, it is vital that the genetic diversity is maintained in the process. I'm not sure how much this is monitored when it comes to captive breeding, but if these animals are to be released into the wild again then they must have the genetic diversity that they would have if they were breeding in the wild. Otherwise, captive breeding could end up doing more harm than good.
157496
Alexa Westerbeck
Posted about 2 years ago
Do zoos help biodiversity conservation?
Stephanie brings up a good point about educating the public about ecosystems and the role of every species in them, instead of wholly focusing just on the animals individually. I think that educating the public more on the interactions of ecosystems and the species in them they could come to better understand how the extinction of a certain species can have a catastrophic domino effect. For a lot of people, I think that when they hear that in the near future there could be no more polar bears, it's in one ear out the other; it doesn't really affect them and they don't really care. But I think that if people could actually see how the loss of such a species can actually be extremely detrimental, it might prompt more action and understanding.
157496
Alexa Westerbeck
Posted about 2 years ago
Do extremist tactics push environmentalism forwards or backwards?
There is a difference between extremist actions and violence. If extreme actions are what are needed to draw attention to an issue and gain widespread support, then they are necessary. But we mustn't resort to violence or any sort of action that could backfire and actually cause more harm than good (i.e. the burning of buildings and bombing whaling ships).
157496
Alexa Westerbeck
Posted about 2 years ago
Do extremist tactics push environmentalism forwards or backwards?
I agree with Ellen. For instance the ski resort example, I don't think a lot of people (including me) ever gave much consideration to all the resources that went in to building the resorts and the carbon emissions that resulted from it. Burning them down doesn't solve anything, but just exhausts resources and contributes unnecessary negative outcomes. I think that was a good point.
157496
Alexa Westerbeck
Posted about 2 years ago
Should shark fishing be banned?
I agree that there must be other uses for the rest of the shark's body, even if it is not in Chinese culture. It's incredibly sad to be that these animals are being killed for such a small benefit and are left to die in such an inhumane way. Should sharks continue to be predated on, they should be used for the entirety of the resources that they could provide. In addition, the killing of such an important part of the marine ecosystem so quickly and in mass numbers will no doubt have long-term negative affects on the food chain and potentially humans as well.
157496
Alexa Westerbeck
Posted about 2 years ago
Should shark fishing be banned?
I think that since the prevalence of shark fins in Chinese and perhaps other cultures is very apparent and rooted, it would be very difficult to ban the fishing of sharks altogether. I do strongly oppose the fishing of sharks purely for their fins. The waste of such a creature for such a small benefit and the damage that removing an apex predator from an ecosystem so quickly is a huge problem. However, I think that there can be a compromise here to preserve the species and the ecosystem as well as the culture that depends on them (although I'm not sure how big of an impact removing shark fins from Chinese diet would have, for instance if it is a common good or a luxury). If there was some sort regulation on how many sharks were caught in a certain time period, this could help preserve the species, although this would be a very difficult thing to regulate. Along with this, I think that if sharks are to still be predated on by humans, it should become policy that the entire shark be used for consumption or some other human use. The removal of just the shark's fin, of which it needs to survive, and then tossing the animal back into the ocean is not only inhumane, but is also simply a waste.