cyn eden

Bellevue, WA, United States

Someone is shy

Cyn hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

Noface
cyn eden
Posted about 2 years ago
For people who have a hard time answering the question: "Where are you from?"
I tried to answer this and ended up deleting it all because in truth I am an American first and foremost. My background is just a hodgepodge of European mixology that contributed the DNA to who I am. However my upbringing in an ethnically diverse community had as much influence if not more on who I would become. I have lived all over the U.S. and discovered each and every state has a culture of it's own. I am grateful for my life experience because I think it gives me a much better understanding of our country and enables me to be far more tolerant and/or compassionate toward my fellow citizens. So where am I from? Here. Right here. If we speak you will hear undertones of accents from places I have lived. People tend to hear the accent they are familiar with, so when they ask me where I am from, they are actually telling me where they are from. They are seeking common ground. We all have something that makes us like those we meet. If we spent more time looking at those things we have in common, and less time trying to define ourselves, and others, as different, we might be better able to work together toward goals that would benefit our communities and our country as a whole. The more we focus on our individual uniqueness, the more divided we become, the less we are able to accomplish and the more negative energy we seem to be expelling into the world around us.
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cyn eden
Posted over 2 years ago
Should education systems begin providing LGBT education for their students?
Honestly no. I would like to see our schools focus less attention on how we are different, and more attention on how we are all alike as human beings, citizens of the United States and the world. I honestly don't care if you are black, white, red or green, male or female, catholic or atheist, asexual, multisexual or whatever. I don't think any class or agenda should get special attention or focus. I do think during all our studies there should be a concerted effort to point out what each and every one of us has in common, and the importance of remembering that when conflicts arise.
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cyn eden
Posted over 2 years ago
Debate: Who's to blame for bullies?
totally agree with Noah, a bully is a victim first, whether parents, siblings, relatives, peers, caregivers/teachers, the bully has been bullied. the thing about bullying I find interesting is all the discussion as if we can "talk" bullies out of bullying. they need a lot more help than can be provided in a school assembly. what's been on my mind lately regarding this is, how do we teach our children to be bullyproof? because ultimately that is the key to happiness and success. there will always be bullies, we will encounter many in our lifetime in some form or another, in long and short term situations. so to learn to cope, maintain ones self esteem, and protect oneself is an essential survival skill.
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cyn eden
Posted over 2 years ago
Telling the truth: are there limits?
That's a difficult question. It seems to me those that are most effective liars are those that are well practiced. So in other words, I am a terrible liar and would not want someone to entrust their life to my incompetence. I probably wouldn't answer the door. :o
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cyn eden
Posted over 2 years ago
Telling the truth: are there limits?
I understand what you are saying, however I believe if the teacher is truly lying, ie: does not believe the student will pass the exam, then she is giving the student a false impression. This might very well lead the student to have false confidence which may then lead to them not fully studying or applying themself. They might in truth believe the teacher will pass them regardless of what they do. (not unheard of in this day and age) Self confidence does not come from false flattery, it comes from successful accomplishment. The student would be better served to be told, if you studied the material and apply what you learned you should do well.
Noface
cyn eden
Posted over 2 years ago
Telling the truth: are there limits?
"Telling a lie may have a positive outcome"? For whom? In whose opinion? Lying is never acceptable. Lying distorts reality and prevents those decieved from making accurate decisions based on sound facts. In the interest of national security, one must always make a decision based on the assumption that at some point, the facts might/will become public. In which case, will the end justify the means? If one functions from a position of honesty, one tends to function with a moral compass that ultimately benefits everyone.