Gail Armand

Volcano, HI, United States

About Gail

Bio

Aloha from the Big Island of Hawaii. My husband and I have an intimate wedding business that includes a rainforest venue and treehouse honeymoon suite atop Kilauea Volcano. We are a full service wedding provider. Included is decor, flowers, music, honeymoon, celebrant, customization, photography, and the amazing Big Island mana.

Comments & conversations

155662
Gail Armand
Posted over 2 years ago
A conversation with Prudential: As people are living longer, how can we plan for a retirement that could last up to 30 years or more?
Having thought this over a bit now, my main thoughts are that retirement plans address an uncertain future, and the exigencies of the present tend to trump those in a tight pinch. The beauty of the Social Security system is the money is saved untouchable. If a person has both the discipline and the means to set aside money on a regular basis and simply leave it alone in a safe interest bearing account, that is a good retirement plan, in addition to whatever they may have through an employer. I personally nicked into every retirement plan I had, as life presented both opportunities and emergencies. So I was able to buy a condo after a divorce, buy a house when the condo lost its value in an earthquake and we needed to move, save the life of my daughter when medical insurance was not enough. Those on this board who are 20 something and outraged or older and blessed with personal wealth may not realize that voluntary savings plans work out great when there is excess, but when you need more, you do tap the savings, and pay the penalties. You are grateful you can do it. And you do not think of it as robbing your future self. All the plans you make never can take into account what you cannot guess at that lies around the corners of time.
155662
Gail Armand
Posted over 2 years ago
A conversation with Prudential: As people are living longer, how can we plan for a retirement that could last up to 30 years or more?
As someone who sat at a desk and also maintained a healthy level of exercise throughout my "main career", I can tell you that desk jobs are not easy on the body. I do not believe we were designed to sit and work for long stretches of time. I am the ripe age of 61, nominally retired. That means I left my killer desk job for a life of my own design. When we were still in grade school, we were being told automation would replace most jobs and we should prepare ourselves for a life of leisure. The 40 hour work week would go out the window. Instead, the reality was the 60 hour work week, for the professional. I seriously doubt this will translate to the longevity projected for this generation. It is more likely the idea that over half of us will live to be 90 is the same sort of fable as the automation taking over work of people. Beyond that, the diseases of these times are increasingly autoimmune disorders that are episodic and debilitating. The source of which are for another discussion.