Guy Dauncey

Victoria, Canada

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Guy Dauncey
Posted over 2 years ago
Allan Savory: How to fight desertification and reverse climate change
Allan's approach is fundamentally sound, and I love it. I have promoted his approach for the past ten years. So I'm 100% supporting Allan's work. HOWEVER, this is one small slice of the host of solutions that are needed to tackle climate change. This method does not have the ability, as Allan claims, to reduce the planet's overburden of atmospheric carbon to 280 parts per million. We have an excess of 250 gigatonnes of carbon in the atmosphere: we're currently at 840 Gt, and we need to get back to 590 Gt, the equivalent of 280 parts per million of CO2. We are adding 10 Gt a year, of which 5 Gt is accumulating in the atmosphere (5 Gt in the oceans). The data for increased soil carbon storage in the grasslands suggests that planned rotational grazing could store max 6 Gt of carbon a year. If we were to cease burning all fossil fuels and cease destroying all tropical forests tomorrow morning, this 6 Gt annual withdrawal could (purely mathematically) reduce the 840 Gt back to 590 in 42 years. However, 6 Gt is the max, and 1.5 Gt a year is more realistic, and meanwhile, we're still adding 5 Gt a year to the atmosphere. So please don't walk away thinking that this is an easy fix for climate change. It's one of a hundred similar solutions. Allan's claim that a billion hectares of Afrtica are being lost to fire every year is also wrong, as Chris Hounsome says below. In Bethesda Maryland, where Martha Holdridge has been using management intensive grazing, soil testing by West Virginia State University demonstrated a five-year increase in soil carbon content in the top two inches from 4.1% to 8.3%, storing an additional 4 tons of carbon per acre over five years (1.8 tonnes per hectare per year). If this could be replicated on 3.4 billion hectares of grassland, it could sequestrate 6 billion tonnes (6 Gt) of carbon a year. http://soilcarboncoalition.org/opportunity and http://soilcarboncoalition.org/calculation
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Guy Dauncey
Posted about 3 years ago
Jon Bergmann: Just how small is an atom?
If so much (to the power of 30) is empty space, which part of the atom responds to gravitational pull? I keep hearing people say that gravity is such a weak force. But if in reality the actual matter - the wavicles - being attracted are so tiny (to the power of 30), does this not make gravity an enormously powerful force?
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Guy Dauncey
Posted over 3 years ago
Is war inevitable? Is it a natural state of human affairs or an aberration, absent from our distant past and perhaps, our future as well?
I'm reading Steven Pinker's 700 page book right now, and it's an incredible piece of work. His hypothesis that violence has declined dramatically is proven with countless lines of evidence, and every "kitchen table" truism about humans always being violent, wars will never end, etc, needs to be questioned and discarded. RH is completely right about war being choice. Pinker specifically contrast our defensive, aggressive nature with our "better angels" nature, and shows how a number of huge civilizational factors have steadily removed the need for us to choose the worse of our natures, and empower us to act form our better natures. The evidence is so compelling, I'd love it if his 700 pages could be condensed down to make it easy for everyone to understand the evidence. There's no "perhaps" that we are moving in the right direction - it's a trend that started 5,000 years go, when we started trading tribal life (where a third of all males die from an act of violence) for states and governance. (from wikipedia...) Peter Singer positively reviewed The Better Angels of Our Nature in The New York Times. Singer concludes: "[It] is a supremely important book. To have command of so much research, spread across so many different fields, is a masterly achievement. Pinker convincingly demonstrates that there has been a dramatic decline in violence, and he is persuasive about the causes of that decline."[6]