Ricardo Gouveia

translator, Freelance / Self-employed
Lisbon, Portugal

About Ricardo

Areas of Expertise

translation, Information Technology, Economics

Universities

FCSH UNL

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Ricardo Gouveia
Posted over 3 years ago
Is History an important subject in school? Or should we be focusing on the future?
I find History a particularly interesting topic I often find myself exploring and studying on my own. You raised an interesting argument. Despite many people considering, and perhaps absurdly, "that History helps us understand the future", I regard that History particularly helps us understand the present. Until high school, I was under this type of thinking and found it the "perfect" way to teach and study History: to always relate/compare it with the present. At first it was hard relating Greek and Roman stuff with 20xx, but it all made sense in the end. As James mentioned, there should be a balance in History, while always making the students think "How does this affect us, right here, right now?". Of course, History is a very long matter, from the Big Bang to the contemporary times. It is interesting to bring History to classrooms, it helps develop kids' way of thinking overall and their way of interpret the present - as well as bringing their little heads some "national culture", and perhaps interest future successful Historians, Archaeologists, Paleontologists. Dinosaurs are a very pre-historic particular matter in History, but we can't ignore dinosaurs and pretend they never existed. It is interesting to the study of biology (it helped me) and helps understand the evolution of planet Earth, it is also useful for fiction (and it would be wrong to let future children pair dinosaurs with unexisting creatures like vampires, zombies or werewolves).
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Ricardo Gouveia
Posted over 3 years ago
Do introverts make better leaders?
As an introvert myself and from my past experience I have been regarded as a decent-to-good leader. Perhaps, what would lack the most would be the communication matter, as mentioned by Salim, as well as in the human-relationship matter; however, I do believe that introverts communicate efficiently but restricting their communication to exactly what they need, want and barely anything more. For example, when I need a colleague to fill a report, I am more likely to make my request in 3-5 words (taking into consideration my mood and my relation with the person), which may sound "robotic" but not exactly rude - I call it a different way to express myself. All the projects under my leadership, both individual or in group (which I don't really like, as Susan Cain proved to be common) have been successful - and even some school projects were a massive success (which would not be possible without the special contribution of every member). I am very organized, very detailed and an annoyingly perfection-seeker, as well as very careful regarding human resources, time, motivation and all other issues present. To finish up, from my own experience, whether being an introvert or an extrovert does not determine whether we are good leaders or not. My dad is the most annoying-extrovert kind of person, but I have learned a lot with him, and learned a lot with me (for example, that the rarest the compliments, the more special and motivating they become - but they should exist, in the right time and in the right place), despite having very conflictual points with him. He worked in a banking institution for over 25 and was regarded as an excellent leader. There are many traits needed to a good leader, extroverts and introverts just have different leadership and managerial styles, along with different POVs, reactions and ways of thinking.