Matthew Kinsella

Eugene, OR, United States

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Comments & conversations

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Matthew Kinsella
Posted about 2 years ago
Do zoos help biodiversity conservation?
Zoos probably have a lot on there plate with maintaining the animals that reside in their boundaries and I doubt they have enough funding and/or man-power to work outside their gates. The role of education and showcasing the animals to the public is important, but if zoos could improve on one aspect they could very well improved educational techniques. Offer classroom tours that go into what it means to conserve biodiversity and how it can be achieved. Really emphasize on the importance of zoos and what is going on in the wild. With that said, I do think it would be awesome if zoos could expand and grow into a university type setting. Where students focus on conservation, research, zoo-keeping, education, and other elements of biodiversity.
159005
Matthew Kinsella
Posted about 2 years ago
From ivory tower to prison cell: How can we bring conservation efforts to the public?
This sustainable prisons movement sounds awesome. Volunteers with more time than anyone and the muscles to do it. This project has the starting potential to bring change and influence to the lives of citizens, ecosystems, the wild, and inmates. Inmates are allowed the chance to truly give back to society in a way that effects everything positively. A movement they will be proud of and a movement that can hopefully chance peoples perspective about earth.
159005
Matthew Kinsella
Posted about 2 years ago
Do extremist tactics push environmentalism forwards or backwards?
Terrorism is a cowardly way to push your views onto someone else through violence. Problems rarely, if at all are solved this way and it doesn't set the right example for how to deal with tough situations. The only positive way to more forward is to convince everyone that change is needed, allowing them to make their own decisions because they view it as the right thing to do. No matter how bad something might be, if you force me to change I'll resist. So it is clear to me that a bombing will only create more tension and hatred for the other party. When peaceful tactics are used, each side is respected and ultimately whatever the people want is the way things will go. This is demonstrated in Japan with whale meat sales.
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Matthew Kinsella
Posted about 2 years ago
If green roofs were mandatory in cities would there be less development and building?
Buildings will rise regardless of mandatory green roofs. I doubt there will be less development and building, but there may be less diversity in what buildings are being constructed. With the added cost of green roofs either the design of the building will have to suffer and be less creative in an architecture sense or the amount of companies able to build will be smaller allowing for them to experience more growth. If somehow tax dollars were able to help contribute to the expense perhaps that would maintain development of buildings.
159005
Matthew Kinsella
Posted about 2 years ago
Should shark fishing be banned?
I feel like regardless of how long something has been a cultural tradition, if it is hurting a species to the point of possible extinction then changes need to be made. I've never had shark fin soup, nor has it been a tradition for me; so I can understand how easy it is for me to say it is wrong. I could imagine letting go of traditions that defines you and your cultural would be hard and take some time. But when an animal is endangered something needs to change. Especially if you don't even use the entire shark. Releasing it back into the open ocean alive and unable to maneuver has to be classified as animal cruelty. It seems like people are going to be given harder and harder choices in the future regarding animals, habitats, and what we need to give up in order for them to share a space on this planet with us. If it means to eat soup without shark fins, then hopefully thats what happens.