Kathryn Lattuca

Coordinator, Education & Learning Programs: Enterprise & Leaders
Toronto, Canada

About Kathryn

Languages

English, French

Areas of Expertise

eLearning, Information curation, Data Analysis and Presentation, Curation, Literature & writing, Editing - Professional / Creative writing, informal learning

An idea worth spreading

Big data companies should be hiring MMORPG designers and developers to support Enterprise functions.

I'm passionate about

Knowledge curation and navigation; collaboration design & technologies, particularly in the HR data realm; live music; literature, eloquence, data visualizations & the distillation of complexity.

Talk to me about

Data visualization; Game theory; Education theory; Content curation; Singularity; Joss Whedon; Efficiency strategy; Puzzles; Camping; Literature - I can frequently be found buried (literally) in books

People don't know I'm good at

Illustration; a talent I consider proprietary & intrinsically valuable in my tech-centric existence, particularly because it provides the gratification of completing slow, manual work for pleasure.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

163599
Kathryn Lattuca
Posted about 3 years ago
If we hold ourselves and our views to a higher standard, are we then 'snobs' and 'conceited' and 'arrogant' or are we seekers of greatness?
I would suggest that many high achievers are involved in some level of competitive inclination - that's fairly intrinsic to motivating one's self in challenging situations of all kinds. Having said that, being gracious can be difficult, particularly in academic or corporate settings where entrepreneurial ideas are often met with the derision you describe. Addressing how we are able to overcome our proprietary feelings is important to getting to that supportive place. I've found that the best way to avoid animosity is to share work transparently, which I'll admit is a challenge for me. It's much easier in a corporate setting, wherein the idea or impact I make is something from which I can learn and exact mobility (a tangible gratification). In doing so, I have learned to embrace the wisdom of a colleague: "The work you are doing doesn't belong to you. Let it fly." I think it's important to add that in that setting, the alternative is being stagnant by corporate design. In an academic setting, I would suggest that the same concept of shared ownership should be fostered to attain mutual appreciation and support - I do understand that unique work, however, is coveted. If you are the achieving party, you can bring others along through inclusion: ask for contribution. This acknowledgement that you respect input from others makes your peers, friends, family, etc. feel valued (better still that you listen and apply feedback, as it is typically - and happily - valuable). If they are the achievers, and they are gracious (or even if they aren't), a similar principle applies (again, I postulate based on personal experience). If you approach the individual with interest, and potentially gratitude, you demonstrate to that individual that you value their work. Asking questions that engage this person in elaborating on their ideas is one way to help you to (potentially) respect them. If you come away from those questions with a lack of respect, or in disagreement, you self-justify.
163599
Kathryn Lattuca
Posted about 3 years ago
If we hold ourselves and our views to a higher standard, are we then 'snobs' and 'conceited' and 'arrogant' or are we seekers of greatness?
I think it's also important to understand that "greatness" is a very subjective qualifier. If I accept that greatness is defined my my own (or another individual's own) valuation of success, I accept the variability of possible responses to people who pursue and achieve. Disdain may arise from our highly differentiated assessments of what qualifies as "greatness" and "success". When I consider "excellence" (literally), I'm acknowledging that a person has achieved greatly against his or her own standards, whereas "greatness" might be largely defined by my own. Essentially, if you surround yourself with people who think you're excellent, you have nothing with which to be concerned. They may not participate in your pursuits; they may find you strange... but those who respect your high standards and the pursuit thereof are unlikely to show you disdain. You can certainly concentrate on garnering respect where you find there is an absence or a negative response. Alternatively, simply continue to pursue achievement. It is much harder to act in the face of derision than to give up on an idea. I like to keep in mind that many life-altering ideas (and, consequently, great thinkers) have historically been snubbed - but not by everyone.