About Andrew

Bio

Andrew Eschtruth is associate director for external relations at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. He directs the Center’s communication activities, including publications, press relations, and social media. Mr. Eschtruth also manages relationships with the government, foundation, and corporate communities.

Previously, Mr. Eschtruth was a senior analyst with the U.S. Government Accountability Office specializing in federal fiscal policy and entitlement programs. He also served on a special assignment as an aide to the Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. Mr. Eschtruth earned his B.A. from the University of Michigan and an M.A. in public policy from Duke University.

Areas of Expertise

Retirement policy, Social Security

Universities

Boston College

Comments & conversations

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Andrew Eschtruth
Posted over 2 years ago
A conversation with Prudential: As people are living longer, how can we plan for a retirement that could last up to 30 years or more?
Krisztian, Good point about saving. It needs to be instilled in people at a young age and conducted as a routine activity that everyone naturally engages in. And saving has two key advantages -- the familiar one of helping you accrue assets to tap later and the less familiar one of reducing your consumption today so that your expectations for how much you need to consume are kept in check. Andy
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Andrew Eschtruth
Posted over 2 years ago
A conversation with Prudential: As people are living longer, how can we plan for a retirement that could last up to 30 years or more?
One type of barrier to effective retirement planning is psychological -- we humans procrastinate, undervalue the importance of events happening in the future, and cling to familiar habits. Our Center has an interactive tool -- "Curious Behaviors that Can Run Your Retirement" -- designed to educate people about these behavioral barriers. It's available at: http://fsp.bc.edu/curious-behaviors-that-can-ruin-your-retirement/
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Andrew Eschtruth
Posted over 2 years ago
A conversation with Prudential: As people are living longer, how can we plan for a retirement that could last up to 30 years or more?
Our work at the Center for Retirement Research indicates that working a few years longer -- not forever -- makes a major difference. Many people today still retire around 62-64. Moving those averages up to the mid-late 60s significantly raises monthly Social Security benefits and gives one's savings more chance to grow. As most of us can expect to live longer than our parents, working a bit longer will still leave time to enjoy retirement.