specs 2

Engineering Consultant - Aerospace
Toronto Ontario, Canada

About specs

Languages

Chinese, English, French

Areas of Expertise

Aerodynamics, Control Systems, human factors and system safety, Aerospace structures and design

An idea worth spreading

2 ideas I think worth spreading

The treatment of mental health disorders needs to be reconsidered to help troubled children and their parents cope. If we don't we do this when they're young, we all pay for it terribly when they get older.

Everybody has a mother who loved them.

I'm passionate about

Finding the positives in everybody and understanding what they want for themselves.
Challenging the biases and prejudice of people and of ideas.

Talk to me about

Human relationships
Skiing
Travel

People don't know I'm good at

Finding the potential in people

Comments & conversations

Noface
specs 2
Posted almost 2 years ago
How does traveling change you ?
Travel forces one to rethink their perceptions of the world by confronting one's culturally ingrained behaviors and attitudes. We come to realize that things we once held to be true or right are often not. We then learn learn what's truly important to ourselves and to society and to keep an open mind. We start to see each other more as equals from different cultures than as inferiors or superiors or enemies. We also learn about the world - how it physically works and our impact on it. Our consciousness gets raised and we come to realize we're all connected. It's a wonderful thing to travel.
Noface
specs 2
Posted about 2 years ago
What about outer space, being an astronaut and space travel fascinated you as a kid?
I was kind of a heavy kid so the weightlessness aspect of it kind of appealed to me ha ha. But it did get me interested in 3 things that became my lifelong avocation - Physics, math and aircraft. Today, putting aside the politics of it, I work in aerospace engineering and still enjoy the challenges. (Just as an aside to the topic at hand - We're adopting a child in the next month, our first. It occurs to me that she, and the rest of the kids born in the past few years will come to see travel into space as somewhat of a routine or easily accessible thing. In 40 - 50 yrs I fully expect low earth orbit sightseeing trips being available to the public for about the relative cost of what a first class airfare ticket to Asia might now cost today. Incredible.)
Noface
specs 2
Posted about 2 years ago
What is something you do that makes you genuinely happy?
I'm impressed at the way you posed the question - It says a bit more about you than know. There is a distinction to be made though between doing something you enjoy and being happy. In my personal parlance, being happy is a state of mind independent of the activity you're engaged in. Enjoying something you're engaged in though is a temporary thing and it can come from different aspects of the job. Lets say somebody has some woodworking talent. One guy finds pleasure in the precision aspects of it but could care less about what he actually made. One guy might be happy because he makes canes that make people see as less of a mobility than a expression of taste. One guy just might like the business aspect of production. One guy might like the feel of wood. One guy might like being an artisan. One guy might just enjoy the satisfaction of a job well done a customer that smiles. etc Enjoying something is easy if you put your mind to it. If you want advice - I'd tell you you to find something you have a talent for or an interest in or want to explore or even talk about and pursue it to the best of your ability, always trying to be the best you can. From there you will eventually find a niche or aspect of it that you will enjoy and be able to make a living at. You may have to balance expectations and reality though. Everything has a max market value. Happiness? - Ok that comes from somewhere else. I think for most, though not everybody, it revolves around love, family, friends, a sense of value to people around you. And it's one of those thing you may not ever come to figure out until later in life = after you've learned a bit about yourself and accept what you learned.
Noface
specs 2
Posted about 2 years ago
Being sentient/functional at an old age and the fear of death within the individual (EDITED). Previously "How old is too old really?".
I believe that a person needs to contribute whatever happiness and understanding they can to the world and those around them for as long as they can. That's what I think life is for. If they can still contribute constructively for that purpose from a wheelchair or a bed then fine - keep at er. But do it for others, not for yourself. And if the grim reaper shows up one day then so be it. Make it quick. There is no point in staving off the inevitable while sucking the life out of everybody around you. I don't want people lingering in the pain or sadness of my passing. I want them to rise above it, be happy and celebrate that our lives crossed and take away whatever lessons or pleasures they can to carry the torch for the next generation. If it gets to the point where I'm just prolonging the inevitable for no gain to anybody then give me the plug. I'll end it myself. There's not much to fear really. If there's another realm to exist in then great lets go. There's nothing more I can do here for anybody. If there isn't - It won't really matter then will it so what is there to fear? On a side note - how come everybody sees a white light when they get close to the end but come back. How come nobody ever sees a red glow or comments on the heat or the smell. Surely some of those folks had some reckoning coming? Just curious. No response required
Noface
specs 2
Posted about 2 years ago
Being sentient/functional at an old age and the fear of death within the individual (EDITED). Previously "How old is too old really?".
I think as they grow older It depends on how the individual sees themselves in regard to the world. If they think it's there for them to enjoy then they tend to fight to the end at all costs. If they think it's there for them to help or contribute to then they're usually ready to go as nature sees fit. No special efforts required to stay alive. They may have regrets about not doing enough but accept that they did what they could.
Noface
specs 2
Posted over 2 years ago
Should the Captain of an Aircraft HAve Command Authority over Law Enfocement in a Hijacking or Crisis
Captains, since 9/11, no longer have the right to refuse armed intervention if they choose...Is this a wise change in policy? I suspect the policy is in regards to Air Marshals and It's exactly the right policy. No captain should be allowed to deny boarding to any air marshal or advise him on his/her duties. If you're concerned about hijacked flights without air marshals, it's still the correct policy. Pilots have absolutely zero training for this situation and possibly are no more capable of dealing with it than any other passenger on board. They are most certainly compromised. Any decision they make will be suspect. They don't have the complete picture of the situation inside and outside the plane. They don't know what resources are available to them nor how to deploy them. I can go on on on but you get the point. They are responsible for the plane and the passengers and only insofar as operating the equipment (the plane) so it doesn't kill any of them. That's it. Perhaps they can assist law enforcement in some way with communications and as an intermediary but when the time for armed intervention comes their first job is to help and assist passengers and other crew.
Noface
specs 2
Posted over 2 years ago
A paper on control systems?
I'll start with the joke about the new airplane we developed. It is so advanced it only requires one pilot and a dog to fly it. The pilot is there to monitor the systems and the dog is there to monitor the pilot and bite him if he tries to touch anything. Ba dum bump!! It's not so outlandish an idea though when you come to appreciate how many aviation accidents have been caused by a pilot overriding the automatic control systems when something appeared to be going wrong. Or when you consider how many accidents have been caused because the inputs to the automatic control system failed and caused it to disconnect itself and then drop everything into the pilot's lap without any warning or preparation? Air France 447 (Rio to Paris) is a classic example. Several air data sensors failed which then disabled the the control systems. The pilot had to take over and fly manually but instead of going back to the basics of flying, he tried to make sense of the same invalid air data that disconnected the system in the first place. Had the pilot (or any one of the 3 in the cockpit) just left everything alone for a few moments, just lifted his hands up in the air and paused, he/they would have recognized a basic principles he's known since since his first flight and we wouldn't be talking about the flight today.. Then there are examples where the aircraft is working perfectly and warned the pilot of TERRAIN AHEAD and to PULL UP yet the pilot ignored the warnings and the aircraft flew into the terrain. Why does this happen in a perfectly functional aircraft with a perfectly capable crew. What is the disconnect between aircraft control systems and the pilot that has resulted in all these completely avoidable accidents.
Noface
specs 2
Posted over 2 years ago
Which Song brings back special memories for you?
Re Saint Saens Carnival of Animals "Aquarium" Well what do you know! I made a video of my niece's performances in a school version of Disney's Beauty and the Beast. I downloaded the prologue music and used it as the background music for the DVD main menu page so I got very familiar with the piece. Thanks for the very pleasant memory