Tim Leisio

Rosemount, MN, United States

About Tim

Bio

I'm a regular guy trying to do irregular things.

An idea worth spreading

Dream for, and act towards, the cities of tomorrow.

I'm passionate about

Design, technology, physics

My TED story

My TED story does not have a title page, table of contents, or foreword. It is simply on the first page, and it is blank. It will stay that way.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

202123
Tim Leisio
Posted 11 months ago
Michael Porter: Why business can be good at solving social problems
There's lots of contempt towards business in these comments. "...business only acts in the service of social issues when it's profitable to do so." This is exactly the conventional thinking sort of mentality that the speaker addressed in his speech. What businesses have failed to realize is that there IS profit in social issues. The idea of shared value that the speaker mentioned is critical for the ability of a business to start down this path. Shared value means way more flexible business models, rethinking the processes behind creating solutions, staying with an issue for the long-term, and actually giving a damn about researching and understanding the context of the people who are touched by the issue(s). In addition, shared value also gets into the idea of defining wealth as more than just money. This is one of the main points I feel Mr. Porter is trying to get across. For those who want more info, see the 2011 Harvard Biz Review article that Mr. Porter made called "Creating Shared Value". http://www.waterhealth.com/sites/default/files/Harvard_Buiness_Review_Shared_Value.pdf
202123
Tim Leisio
Posted over 2 years ago
Jer Thorp: Make data more human
So... in Shilo Shiv Suleman's TED talk, she uses art, technology, and data (the collections that she talks about) to tell a story. You comment to say "Wow! Some great images." Yet in this talk, when Jer Thorp is using art, technology, and data to tell a story, you say this "...strokes the human ego and fails to do more than that." Do you see any sort of contradiction here? I could also ask at what point do you think new combinations of art, technology, and data become useful for progress of any kind?
202123
Tim Leisio
Posted over 2 years ago
How do we get back the neighborhood?
This is a really good thing to see, thanks for the link, Janet! There's definitely a need for more transparent data so everyone can easily access it. What we need next is a developer to take all that data, and put it into an automatically-updated system where other developers can access the data via API. We also need more cities around the world to get on-board with this sort of data access :) (edit) Did a bit of a google spree over lunch - for those of us in the US: http://www.data.gov/ Of course this is on the national level. It would be good to research states and individual cities beyond this.
202123
Tim Leisio
Posted over 2 years ago
Jennifer Pahlka: Coding a better government
I'd like to try and amplify your point, Ziska. With all the political lingo and history flinging around in these comments, you'd think you need a few PhDs to understand the real problem here. But we dont. It's about people taking care of each other. Not political parties, ideological viewpoints, etc. Why can't all you people debating just focus more on doing what you can to ACT on making each others lives better and more humane? Technology, as demonstrated in the incredible presentation by Jennifer Pahlka, has the ability for people to ACT in kindness for others. This is no more complicated than that people!
202123
Tim Leisio
Posted over 2 years ago
How do we get back the neighborhood?
Not exactly. I ended with the statement I did because I am into the design/technology/web industries, but there's much more to consider than just one topic. I see gamification as a trending interest. It's newer, and people haven't had that perspective before. Speaking generally, however, games can serve as a subset of research for a higher-level field of psychology. Take for instance design with intent (http://www.danlockton.com/dwi/Main_Page). With this, the focus is on the psychology of behavior change. It just so happens that games have been using a set of these design with intent lenses that Dan Lockton studies. That leaves more lenses yet to consider. When we take the view that this is a whole field of psychology, then it's apparent that technology is simply a subset tool to be used for behavior change (and gamification a subset of that). There are other tools as well that can assist behavior change. This is why Mark Raymond, in "Victim of a City", brings the discussion about the psychology of architecture (again, generalizing). And wouldn't you know, Dan Lockton has a lens for that! Architecture as a tool for behavior change. This is also what Steve Johnson, in "Where Good Ideas Come From", addresses. Johnson also goes a step further, however and grounds the idea with the way biology functions. This, in my opinion, brings someone like myself back to ideas about technology. Technology allows us to network like our biology intends us to. It can empower us, in such ways as Jennifer Pahlka, in "Coding a Better Government", suggests. Why can it do this? Because it networks us. It puts us in, or mimics the likeness of, an environment to create new ideas. It may not be the exact local communities that we remember, but at least it might be the start of something more meaningful than what we have. Hopefully this clarifies/expands my previous message. I'll gladly try again if it doesn't!
202123
Tim Leisio
Posted over 2 years ago
How do I get employees to do their job? How do I motivate them?
Hey Jon, I would extend the possibility to use a bit of design thinking to figure things out. (wiki it) First you probably need to understand the problem. Have you talked to the people involved? What are they feeling? What are they going through? Maybe you can gain some perspective on what's going on with them before you apply an sort of managerial status? Wicked problems require that everyone participates. Once you understand your employees, then you can think about solutions. Get them all involved with something for 5-10 minutes that encourages them and brings them together? Open them up a bit and see what they end up saying. It may have nothing to do with your organization. It may be the organization. It's an experiment, and it doesn't have to be elaborate, the simplest of conversations can lead to great insights. Hope this helps.