Lucy Irons

Eugene, OR, United States

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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
I like your point about finding benefits of invasive species. I also agree that in a lot of situations, the best thing is for humans to leave well enough alone. However, as humans how often does that actually happen? For some reason we always feel the need to fuss with our environment.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
A good example, I think is cyanobacteria. As the first oxygen-creating species, it could have potentially destroyed everything. As oxygen levels rose, organisms struggled to survive in the new environment. However, without cyanobacteria, life as we know it would not exist. Oxygen breathing humans would not exist. The history of life on earth is littered with stories of upheaval and the subsequent quest to restore balance.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
I totally agree that there are different degrees of invasiveness. An interesting question that I think is relevant both in biology and in global politics at the moment, is whether or not we, as humans, have the right or responsibility to "fix" things that we deem as problems with our environment? Is it about what's beneficial to US or about what's beneficial to the planet? Humans are special in that we can think outside of our own survival and try to look at what would make ecosystems better as a whole and sometimes I think we'll see that those two goals oppose each other.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
This is a good point. What defines a native species? They have always been moving and migrating around the globe both with and without the help of humans. This spread of genetic information is incredibly useful and has been in the past. A question to think about is, are humans causing this phenomenon to occur too quickly? Are we moving species around faster than the ecosystems can adapt and recover? It's definitely interesting to consider.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
Where would you place Colony Collapse Disorder in relation to the many other problems facing our society?
Like many are saying, CCD is a mysterious problem with no known causes or solutions. For this reason, I think it is very important to educate people about this issue and hope that by raising awareness, we can also increase funding for research regarding this dilemma. I didn't know about CCD until a couple days ago and this is a thing that has been going on for 6 YEARS. Not only that, but I'm a biology major. There are so many people living in the United States who know nothing about the bee crisis and therefore don't know that it needs funding and attention. I think spreading the word is the first order of business on our bee-saving agenda.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
Where would you place Colony Collapse Disorder in relation to the many other problems facing our society?
I agree that climate change should be one of our top priorities because it is affecting a lot of things and species downstream. In addition, I think the scary thing about CCD is that we don't know what's causing it and therefore we don't know how to fix it. It's stressful to think that by the time we commit enough money and research to finding out what is actually wrong, it could be too late.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
While opting out of vaccines is a good example of the tragedy of the commons, it is an even better example of a positive externality and the free rider problem. In economics jargon, an externality is a cost (not monetary) or benefit that an individual experiences as a result of a purchase they did not take part in. In the case of vaccines, even if you choose not to get vaccinated for an infectious disease, you still receive a benefit every time someone else pays for the vaccine. Similarly, a "free rider" in economics is someone who consumes a resource without paying for it. In the case of vaccines, if you chose not to get vaccinated, you still get to consume the health benefit provided by the vaccine. I don't believe in an all powerful all controlling government. However, I believe that education is really important in order to quell some vaccine related fears. While this isn't necessarily true with HPV, there are people with compromised immune systems that are RELYING on a large number of people being vaccinated for diseases such as the flu, etc. so that they can avoid at worse a deadly infection and at best an expensive hospital visit. If we let people opt out based on conspiracy theories or even the basic human fear of the unknown, someone else's life could be jeopardy.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
Are memes important for our survival? How can we draw on memetic theory to inspire ideas of sustainability that go viral?
I think, with regards to sustainability, the key to propagation is going to be some above board method. I don't think propaganda or subliminal trickery are the tickets to this meme's success. Rather, I agree with what a lot of people are saying-that if sustainability can be boiled down into a simple image or symbol or phrase that finds a way to take hold in the internet "mind" and resonate with people then it has the potential to spread quickly and successfully.
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Lucy Irons
Posted about 2 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
Ashley, I agree that sexual activity is not so much a lifestyle choice as it is the way we reproduce as a species and something that we are biologically inclined to do. However, each person is going to go about sex in a different way and this is, to some extent, a choice. For example, some people wait until marriage to become sexually active and then sleep with the same person for the rest of their life. These people are most likely at a lower risk for HPV and therefore vaccinating them is costing the health care system money without any large benefit to herd immunity or the spread of the disease. However, people who have more sexual partners in their lifetime are going to be at a higher risk of both contracting and spreading the disease and are good candidates for vaccination. I'm not entirely sure how I stand on a mandate of this vaccine. It proves an interesting topic for debate because unlike other diseases with vaccines we have mandated, HPV does not pose an equal risk to every individual.