Lia Heifetz

Douglas, AK, United States

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Comments & conversations

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Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
I agree. I think that trying to weigh out the benefits vs the bad contributions that an invasive species can be a time consuming period. Implementing goals, strategies, and actions can be even more time consuming. What is important though is prevention in the first place. If educating people to become more weary of what they are bringing with them when they travel, and how invasive species can affect our environment hopefully some of the species that have potential to invade, will not have the opportunity to.
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Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
I think there are definitely possibilities of invasives that can have positive effects on their ecosystem, especially given some time for the ecosystem to adapt. If ecosystems are given time to adapt, it seems to me like eliminating them could create even more problems, and may be a waste of money to remove. A quote from an article in Penn State Science (http://science.psu.edu/news-and-events/2011-news/Carlo2-2011) sums up this idea well: "Nature is in a constant state of flux, always shifting and readjusting as new relationships form between species, and not all of these relationships are bad just because they are novel or created by humans...We need to be more careful about shooting first and asking questions later -- assuming that introduced species are inherently harmful. We should be asking: Are we responding to real threats to nature or to our cultural perception and scientific bias?"
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Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
Where would you place Colony Collapse Disorder in relation to the many other problems facing our society?
I know some of the efforts to counteract colony collapse disorder include starting your own bee colony, mason bees have been specifically recommended for this. I do not know much about mason bees, or distribution of native populations of bees throughout the country, or world, but I wonder if us bringing in non-native bees could be a factor contributing to colony collapse disorder. Was there an initial increase in bee populations once they started being used to pollinate cash crops? I am curious how the baseline population of bees compares with the current population.
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Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
Where would you place Colony Collapse Disorder in relation to the many other problems facing our society?
It seems to me that colony collapse disorder is something that should be a top priority in comparison to other problems we are facing. Bees provide a a vital part of ecosystems, providing the ecosystem service of pollination that allows many other trophic levels to exist. From what I can tell research has not yet been conclusive in understanding why this is taking place. I know some suggestions of causes such as parasites, pesticide use, or malnutrition have been thrown around, but I have not heard about how we may be directly causing this, Colonies are transported for hours at a time. Has this added stress been considered when thinking about why there is a decline in honeybees? Are other populations of bees facing losses, or primarily the bees that are used for mass agriculture pollination?
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Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
Are memes important for our survival? How can we draw on memetic theory to inspire ideas of sustainability that go viral?
Tastemakers are definitely key to determining what memes would be successful. It seems like other popular trends in our society, sustainability is now on the front line. In order for this meme to be spread it needs to continue to be fashionable and appealing to the masses. An article in Bloomberg Business Week discusses this topic. Is sustainable technology a fad or innovative? Much of the discussion is whether or not green initiatives deliver "real value," or if they will fade away soon. I think that the real value that must accompany a successful spread to sustainability is the intrinsic value that most people seek, either consciously, or subconsciously.
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Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
Are memes important for our survival? How can we draw on memetic theory to inspire ideas of sustainability that go viral?
I think this is a really great idea. The use of memes to promote sustainability has the potential to spread the ideas that have potential to be important to the greater population or environment. I think the key in making these successful is, like Rishi states, the focus on how we, personally, can gain from being sustainable. It is hard for some people to think into the future, and understand how we need to act now so we can prosper later, so the focus of memes that we want to pass on needs to be on the “I”. This is especially true in places were sustainability is commonly forgotten, such as in the developing world. People of high standing are more consumed with “survivability,” and solving short problems, and are not so focused on the future. The questions “how can I gain from this?” or, “what does this do for me?” or “why should I care right now?” are the focus of these people. I think it is a hard task to conquer to make those who are focused on instant gratification to think out of the scope, and into the future. It will take some creative minds!
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Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
In regards to the cost of the vaccine: I think the primary cost that is associated with the vaccine is not the cost that the average American would have to pay. There are plenty of vaccination programs (Vaccines for Children program, Merck Vaccine Patience Assistance Program, Planned Parenthood, and many universities) that provide the vaccination for no, or a reduced cost. I think the main issue, and thing that would stop girls from getting the vaccination (if given the choice) is the stigmatism that is associated with young sexually active people. Although I feel that the shot should not be mandated, I do find it hard to believe that our government that would even potentially mandate this vaccination that prevents a STI that most public schools aren't even authorized to teach about. I feel strongly that the decision to have this shot, or not, should be left up to the individual because I feel that if they did receive the knowledge about the potential risks associated with various sexual diseases the individual would chose to have the shot, the real problem lies in that we are taught abstinence. If more of the focus of our sexual education programs was on prevention of STIs, and WHY we should care about preventing these, then maybe more people would understand why we want to protect ourselves from HPV and act accordingly. Maybe some of these people would chose abstinence, but those who do not would understand why it is important they receive this vaccination.
Noface
Lia Heifetz
Posted over 2 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
I agree. I feel that this should not and does not need to be a mandated vaccination. If sexual education were provided then young girls would be able to make a decision on their own, and given the correct information I feel that girls would see the clear advantages of receiving it. If sex was not so stigmatized in our system, than maybe it would be easier for girls to receive the information that they need. After learning about how HPV is spread, how cervical cancer can affect us, and how preventable it all is it seems obvious that one would want to protect themselves against this virus. Although having a mandatory vaccination may be in our best interest, it ultimately should be our own decision, and right, to receive it, or not.