Sara Bradford

Eugene, OR, United States

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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
I really like your idea that we should find a use for the invasive species, so that we can make it a resource rather than a problem. It would take research to see where it would benefit, but if you could find a use for an invasive plant or animal then you could reduce the population size and benefit our own population. That is a great suggestion versus other methods that might not be as effective.
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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
Are you concerned about the spread of invasive species?
When I think about invasive species I think about a harmful species that has a huge negative effect on its ecosystem and surrounding ecosystems. This is true, but I also think that the degree of negativity of the invasive species needs to be consider in answering this question. An invasive species that does not kill everything it comes into contact with is going to be less of a threat and could potentially be a benefit when looking at the adaptation that is necessary with the overall loss of biodiversity and climate change in today's world. In this case we could let evolution run its course and only mediate when problems arise. On the other hand invasive species that has negative effects that would wipe out an entire ecosystem would not be beneficial to us and would definitely need to be eradicated. So overall, I think that to determine whether or not we should be concerned about an invasive species lies within the degree of detrimental effects that the invasive species has on the ecosystem.
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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
Where would you place Colony Collapse Disorder in relation to the many other problems facing our society?
Education should be a major part of a solution to the disappearance of honey bees. If more people knew about the risks that were out there if there were no honey bee pollination than there would be more of a will to start their own hives. The education can also include a portion dedicated to educating them that honey bees do not want to sting you because they will die. I know a lot of people who are more scared and who would like to see bees go, but only because they think that their purpose is to sting or harm you. Through early education you can disprove this and more people would be will to have their own hives for honey bees. I do agree that it speculation is the main route to solving and discovering new solutions to our past, present, and future problem and this can always begin with education.
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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
Where would you place Colony Collapse Disorder in relation to the many other problems facing our society?
Colony collapse disorder should be at the top of our list for research in today's society. We need to research the cause of what is happening to these worker honey bees and determine what the cause to their disappearance is. In A New Threat to Honey Bees, the Parasitic Phorid Fly Apocephalus borealis, Andrew Core and colleagues discovered the parasitic fly which kills or disorientates the honey bee. They say that there are no fly colonies around the hive itself, so the fly most likely comes in contact with the worker honey bee when it is away from the hive. I think that if we could spend more time researching this topic then we could possibly find ways to kill this parasitic fly saving our pollinators. If it turns out that they are not the actual cause of the Colony Collapse disorder due to there being no carcasses being found then we could spend time researching other possible effects like climate change in a laboratory. In the big picture it would be cheaper to spend the time doing research on the cause of the disappearance of the honey bee than the amount of money that we would have to spend pollinating our own crops.
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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
Are memes important for our survival? How can we draw on memetic theory to inspire ideas of sustainability that go viral?
You definitely make a valid point. If there was a way to create a meme that would involve the rich and the famous to bring about a sustainability awareness I think that it would be generally accepted. Teens and young adults would see their idols 'going green' and strive to do the same. I know that there have been a few commercials out there that involve these ideas, but if they were to increase such media than we would see an increase in the amount of individuals that joined together in sustainability efforts.
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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
Are memes important for our survival? How can we draw on memetic theory to inspire ideas of sustainability that go viral?
Memes are definitely an important factor in our survival because they are simply in everything we do or see. We take a meme and interpret it in our own way and find a way to apply it to our lives. As we pass these memes onto another individual they too can take what they need from it or apply it to something in their lives or simply relate to it. I think that what you do with that meme determines whether or not it will be taken to the extreme or simply put to the side. A way that you can apply it to sustainability is find a way to relate to the masses. Simple things such as hilarious sarcastic youtube videos seem to be a hit right now, so instead of going a serious route with the meme you can reach a response with what might be 'popular' in today's society. A meme can inspire a passionate response to sustainability if people are able to relate to it on a personal level.
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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
I agree as well I think that education of HPV is more important right now than mandating that everyone receive the vaccination. The choice to then decide whether or not you will get the vaccine becomes something that you have control over and are aware of. The fact is that people need to know what HPV can do to you and that once you get it there is no cure. Regular papsmears (which everyone should be doing) are then necessary to make sure that it does not develop into cancer. They also need to know that it actually takes a quite a bit of time to contract the virus and have it develop into cancer, so as long as they stay in control of the situation they can prevent the cancer themselves. Safe sex should also be promoted with this education even though you might still receive it from genital genital contact that is uncovered it would still be beneficial. Ultimately people deserve a choice in the matter just like they choose to have multiple partners.
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Sara Bradford
Posted over 2 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
In order to mandate this drug I feel as if you would have to mandate it to the entire population. Although there is no way to test a man to determine whether he does or does not have it, he is still a possible carry of HPV. If you do not mandate it for the entire population you are singling out half of the population that can carry and spread the disease. HPV is the primary cause for cervical cancer, but only covers 70% of the cause of it. The other 30% of this still goes on to cause cancer. On the other hand it protects against 90% of genital warts which is found on both men and women. The vaccination does not have as high a percentage of blocking cervical cancer as it does for genital warts. So although I agree that this vaccination should not be mandated for the purpose of taking away our rights to decide what we are going to do with our bodies, I believe that if it is mandated then it should mandated to the entire population.