Rishi Patel

Gillette, WY, United States

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157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
Do zoos help biodiversity conservation?
I agree with the belief that zoos are an effective learning tool, especially in places where wildlife preserves aren't available; however, the effectiveness continues beyond just a simple zoo visit. The ability to view majestic animals up close and personal is a very powerful image that breeds passion. Learning from textbooks about the importance of polar bears is great, but learning that same knowledge while watching polar bears play in an exhibit is breathtaking, and resonates in the soul. We talk about how we should spread awareness, and zoos do a great job of that, thus helping conservation on the personal level and through funding.
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
Do zoos help biodiversity conservation?
Are you kidding me!? Wildlife preserves are huge and the point of them is to remove human influences on them! The point of a Zoo is to show off cute animals to you kids and make some money off of merchandise. Preserves are thousands of acres in size, remote and have existed for ages to become stabilized. You can't just construct a zoo some place with a few planted trees and add some animals and expect the species to preserve themselves. It takes so much more than that, because human reach goes beyond physical boundaries. For it to be effective would require large amounts of money and space that we as a society don't want to provide. Lets do a quick run down of what it takes to run a zoo, and you tell me how to find a way to preserve wildlife from human contact, while at the same time profiting off the land. A San Diego Zoo financial report can be found here: http://www.sandiegozoo.org/disclaimers/financial_report_2009.pdf It took $149,567,000 just to maintain the exhibits and they spent $17,046,000 on research and conservation. They made $63,630,000 from admissions alone and $86,250,000 from auxiliary activities (auxiliary activities include retail merchandise, food and beverage, transportation operations, Wild Animal Park parking, educational activities and other similar support activities). $17,391,000 came from taxes, to maintain the San Diego Zoo for the year of 2008. The total area of the San Diego Zoo is 99 acres. So to propose switching to a wildlife preserve is just impossible. You can't get rid of the exhibits and throw the animals in one giant plot of land and get it to work. The ideals don't make sense! How do you display all the animals at the same time as a way to make money to run the preserve yet not make it safe nor easy to walk around and look at all the animals? Zoos do a lot toward conservation both through education and through research and conservation efforts, and that goal is incredibly efficient for the space that it uses.
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
From ivory tower to prison cell: How can we bring conservation efforts to the public?
I agree that we should respect natural diversity, but this idea of "filling their minds with the correct information" seems a little brainwashy and to forceful. Shouldn't presenting the information and the proper evidence suffice for our children? The future is already experiencing that, but its the older generations that haven't been keeping up. Education will keep our young generations on top of the current hot topics, but those who have lives aren't necessarily doing the same. I believe the issue is not to create trends with our younger generations, but to encourage the older generations. We should be encouraging the working classes to contribute through practical ideals such as limiting our water/electricity/heat. Even better, lets improve on the waterless toilet idea, lets utilize green roofs, etc. These are all very practical small steps that we should all be making to contribute, but right now the responsibility lies in the working class, not our 5th graders.
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
From ivory tower to prison cell: How can we bring conservation efforts to the public?
I agree that publicity is an important component to conservation, but I believe that practicality also plays a large role in our efforts. Air travel is a huge component toward our carbon footprints, but it is almost a necessity for how our society runs. We all know that limiting our carbon footprint helps prevent global warming, but how practical is it to limit the number of flights we take in a year? We can try all we want to bring awareness to the issue, but until we also provide practical solutions to our problems, our efforts will be in vain. Developments in video conferencing are a great example of a technology that meets both these criteria. By using video conferencing, we can limit the number of business trips we have to make, both saving time and money for the people involved and also reducing the impact we make on the planet.
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
Do extremist tactics push environmentalism forwards or backwards?
Documentaries would help, but that means I have to have access to the documentary, be informed of the issue, and have the time to watch it. I watch the news, and it is brought to me. Extremist acts bring my attention to the issue, and even if I believe what they are doing is wrong, it persuades me to investigate the issue. Right now there is an issue with shark finning, but I'm more inclined to go view MIB 3 than a documentary on it, purely because shark finning and the thousand other environmental tragedies is a back burner issue for me. If some extremist goes and blows up some shark finning vessels and the media brings that to my attention, I will be more inclined to explore that issue because someone is crazy enough to commit a violent act to stop it. If someone is that passionate about stopping shark finning, then it must be a huge issue. From there I can assess the situation and then make a difference. Extremist acts give us that glimpse of the issue and draw our attention, from there we can handle it ourselves. Extremism gives us that jump start.
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
Do extremist tactics push environmentalism forwards or backwards?
First of all, every group you referred to wanted another group of individuals killed. Of course their method was detrimental to the world because their goal was detrimental to the world. Eco-terrorism uses small acts of violence to mitigate the damages to the world. The ideal is still that the ends justify the means which is a discussion I'll let consequentialist and deontologicalists hash out. As per the topid on hand, I wouldn't say it never works. Extremist acts at least raise awareness which can then further power the movement through the media. I personally didn't know much about whaling until "Whale Wars" came out. I didn't know about chicken farms until PETA started protesting KFC. I didn't know about animal testing until Rodney Coronado fire-bombed a laboratory at Michigan State University. In the short term they are a fantastic method for at least informing the greater public of the issue at hand, but in the long run, I agree it does more harm than good.
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
If green roofs were mandatory in cities would there be less development and building?
You have to remember that people who would make green roofs wouldn't be just homeowners. You have to think of a renting scenario as well, apartment complex owners, hotel owners, etc. For someone who owns an apartment complex with a green roof, they could charge a bit extra for the green roof and make a bit more profit in the long run, and as a renter that would be justified because you save on heating/cooling costs. There is an incentive for both the building owner and the renter.
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
Should shark fishing be banned?
I agree with your stance, but I want to bring up a thought experiment that was once brought to my attention regarding apex predators. During the near extirpation of Great Whites, we saw a boom in seal populations. Why didn't we utilize this boom of seals for their seal blubber? In general, sharks will eat fish, squid, molluscs, crustaceans, turtles, dolphins, porpoises, rays and seals, etc. could we utilize their diet and incorporate it into our economy somehow?
157728
Rishi Patel
Posted about 3 years ago
Should shark fishing be banned?
I think that the issue goes beyond whether or not a substance is good for you. Tobacco products and alcohol are both extremely detrimental to ones health and to those around you, yet those substances are not illegal to consume, purely for the fact that we as humans have the right to utilize some products for uses other than health reasons. Painting our houses, porcelain toilets and watering our lawns are purely aesthetics which we enjoy, but for the most part are a waste of resources, we could make due with one color protective paint, squatters, and weeds in our lawns, but I for one do not want to live in such a manner. Shark fin soup is a cultural activity, and banning it for the sense that it is not good for your health is a bit mislead. I think that a ban on a cultural product is wrong, but I also believe that cutting off a fin and releasing the shark is also wrong because, well, that's just messed up. So the question for me comes down to whether we should kill sharks for all of their potential products, or not harvest them at all. I would side with the stance that we should not ban shark finning, but should ban shark harvesting, or at least place a restriction on how many can be harvested. Although I'm not sure how effective this might be in practice.