Lacie Holt

Eugene, OR, United States

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Comments & conversations

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Lacie Holt
Posted over 3 years ago
Where would you place Colony Collapse Disorder in relation to the many other problems facing our society?
I would place CCD at the top of the list for problems that need immediate, nation-wide attention. The implications of honey bees disappearing are far reaching and would affect the public fairly rapidly, compared to other environmental concerns. The fact that the symbiotic relationship between bees and flowering plants is collapsing is nothing short of devastating. This relationship has been flourishing for millions of years, and such a sudden collapse is not natural or normal in any way. So much of our world depends upon the pollination of plants. No society could make it through a decade without bees, at least not without morbid consequences. If there is any issue the nation, and world, needs to work together to get to the bottom of, it is this one. As far as the impact on humanity, this makes a 'silent spring' seem like a minor, insignificant issue. The nation was able to put priority on discovering and fixing what was wrong with our national bird in the 1960s. An issue that threatens our food supply should be that much more of a priority. This is potentially a national security issue that dwarfs terrorism. Educating the public will help "get the ball rolling". The idea of bees declining scares people, but it seems no one knows the potential consequences or doesn't want to think about them. Haagen-Dazs is doing a good job raising awareness. They know that if there's a decline in bees they will be deeply impacted. Other food companies should become aware of the potential losses they will face if this trend continues. I feel that if our nation made this a priority we would be able to solve this issue like we have been able to in the past. Humanity has able to accomplish what were once impossible feats, and saving the honey bees could be our chance to prove ourselves again.
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Lacie Holt
Posted over 3 years ago
Are memes important for our survival? How can we draw on memetic theory to inspire ideas of sustainability that go viral?
I think that is a really good point. Human society is here because of us mimicking each other and abandoning the ideas that don't work. The environmental/resource situation is getting so bad that if the next couple generations don't come up with a new way of consuming or living that works, humanity is going to take a turn for the worse. Every meme that humans have created, in essence, has been an experiment. They have all worked for a time, but it is getting to be the age where our technologies (our memes) are getting to be too much for us to handle and we are starting to become owned by them, we couldn't live if they stopped working tomorrow. Soon we will have to abandon some of these technologies, and add them to the other ideas that have ultimately failed. Western society should resort to a simpler, or at least different, way of living. We are now seeing the long term consequences of settling down from a nomadic life (a meme that today has spread to almost all human cultures). Unless we come up with an idea that is scalable and spreadable to counteract resource scarcity and over consumption, memes might be what made our species great and also what ultimately killed us off.
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Lacie Holt
Posted over 3 years ago
Are memes important for our survival? How can we draw on memetic theory to inspire ideas of sustainability that go viral?
I think the importance of sustainability is starting to break into the mainstream culture. The fact that one can go into a department store and buy a shirt that says recycle on it (ironic, I know) shows that the public does care about the effects we have on the Earth. Throughout most societies the rich have been a huge source of memes for their culture. People imitate what those of a higher social status are doing. For example, pale, plump women use to be considered beautiful, back when only wealthy women were able to eat that much and stay indoors all the time. Now, our culture tends to consider skinny, tan women to be beautiful, in a time when it is a luxury to spend time in the sun, eat healthy food, and spend time exercising. If movie stars and the ultra rich were to participate in sustainable activities, such as having home vegetable gardens, patronizing locally owned businesses, and *gasp* wearing an outfit more than once, the public would take that idea and duplicate it on a fairly massive scale. Especially if they raised awareness, it would be a step in the right direction.
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Lacie Holt
Posted over 3 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
I like the idea of an opt-out vaccination. If doctors were required to educate adults, especially parents, about the disease and the vaccine, then the public could make educated, personal choices. A mandate with the option to opt out is a fair government response to a disease such as this. The fact that someone can contract this from one isolated sexual encounter makes this disease a risk to almost the entire US population, so people should be educated and the vaccine made available. I am usually for freedom of choice and the government not making personal decisions, such as medical decisions, for the citizens. Because this disease is spread through direct sexual contact, and not in a faster more aggressive fashion, people should be given the choice to be vaccinated. Even if getting the vaccine seems like a no brainer, the fact that there is a choice is important to me.
Noface
Lacie Holt
Posted over 3 years ago
When it comes to vaccine intervention for disease control, should personal liberty go before the benefit to society?
I am also torn on this issue. I think that if 35% of young women were infected with a disease that wasn't sexually transmitted, most people would want a vaccine mandated. However, this disease is transmitted by a life style choice. HPV affects a large percentage of the population because a large percentage of the population is sexually active with more than one partner. For the part of the population that isn't sexually active, even into adulthood, it seems unfair to mandate that they receive a vaccine that might be against their moral values. If we mandate a vaccine to the entire population including those that do not engage in the 'risky' behavior, where is the line drawn? About 34% of American adults are obese, which is a large amount of the population. Does that mean if a cure for obesity-related illnesses, like diabetes, were found that all Americans should be required to get the vaccine? A disease that is the direct result of a behavior is different from a disease that is spread by droplet or indirect contact. However, with HPV it only takes one time to contract the disease, making it different from obesity which is why I am torn. Ideally, people should be educated about HPV and make an educated choice if they want to get themselves vaccinated.