Giuseppe Conte

Business Consulting Senior Manager, University of Nottingham

About Giuseppe

Bio

PhD, Fluid Dynamics (Nottingham University) - Chemichal Engineering laurea degree (University of Naples Federico II) - Management Consultant (People & Organisational Change & Business Process Design)

Languages

English, Italian

Areas of Expertise

organisational change, Business Process Design & Improvement, Business intelligence, Chemical Engineering, Cultural change, Coaching - Executive / Leadership, Coaching - Career

An idea worth spreading

Imagination can do anything. We see disease through the interference of the energy it emits with that generated by diagnostic equipment. One day, diagnostic equipment will be used to "fix" the image of disease so it "looks" healthy like surrounding tissue (e.g. a therapeutic MRI machine), thereby feeding the energy balance that is necessary to turn diseased tissue into healthy tissue. It's like "visioning" through the physical means of a machine generated elecromagnetic field. Science fiction for now but the application of fields to the treatment for example of cancer is already under way though we keep looking at interaction at the electrochemical level.

I'm passionate about

Medicine, Cellular and Molecular Biology, Energy, Cleantech, Business Intelligence, Psycology, Nutrition, Hypnosis, Spirituality, Complexity

Comments & conversations

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Giuseppe Conte
Posted over 3 years ago
Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science
Well, from this talk I get that we may end up in the hands of the woman biting the carrot because evidence based medicine is widely disconnected from the people it should serve. The sad and yet liberating truth is that in 10 years the internet will have more useful data on the use of this or that natural extract from people following the advice of unqualified punters than from official trials that are for the most part feeding a faboulus money making machine. Official ways should accept more approximation and decide for trials regardless of their profitability. Placebos should be leveraged for therapeutic purpose rather than considered a nuisance by scientists.
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Giuseppe Conte
Posted over 3 years ago
"Are patients getting sick or cured in hospitals?''
Agree wih the above. Having spent some time in healthcare, I have discussed with hospital boards how hospitals organisation should be switched from speciality-centric to patient centric. Hospitals do recognise the importance of care pathways but performace (especially financial performance) is seldom linked to care pathways. Typically a hospital will measure it's performance al the level of specialty departments and quality performance is either measured at the same level (which is useless) or at the level of care pathways wich is disjointed with financial performance i.e. the patient's results have nothing to do with financial results. In sept 2011 in the harvard business review, you'll find a similar argument made by Robert Kaplan and Michael Porter who then get into a detailed description of how performance could be tracked at a deep level of detail. I am not so convinced in the necessity of deep granularity of data to manage performance but the point about patient centric org of hospitals by care pathways is spot on
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Giuseppe Conte
Posted over 3 years ago
"Are patients getting sick or cured in hospitals?''
I think that overall it's about shifting hospital care from looking after a condition to looking after a human being. Hospital infrastructure is the starting point and that is certainly a massive issue in some Southern Italian cities such as Naples. And yet, if we were prepared to care for a human being instead of a disease and did all that goes with that, we'd massively improve patients condition. You certainly don't go to hospital to watch a movie or play a cards tournement thought there wouldn't be anything wrong with that if that was possible. But a patient should be looked at holistically, especially if hopitalised for cronic conditions. E.g. if I went to hospital and they made me participate in my nutrition and in understanding my overall condition, I'd feel more responsible and participative of my health. Also, there is a problem of incentives: hospitals get money on the basis of the number of beds they keep full and especially bad hospitals where people don't want to go, will hold patients in preparation and after surgery for far to long.
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Giuseppe Conte
Posted over 3 years ago
Brian Goldman: Doctors make mistakes. Can we talk about that?
The important outcome of what Dr Goldman suggests is that in an open system where experience are shared and treasured, individuals no longer become single points of failure. The apparatus no longer relies on individualities but it behaves as a more efficient adaptive system. Sharing means supporting. Supporting means that mistakes can still happen even with the same or higher frequency at the individual level but a larger number of mistakes have to line up for a patient to die or suffer irreversible damage. This is a very important practical outcome. Analogies could be made virtually for any profession: medicine is not about making great doctors but about delivering great care for the people it serves. More people should behave like Dr Goldman in virtue of this.