Anna Zawilska

Durban, South Africa

Someone is shy

Anna hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

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Anna Zawilska
Posted over 2 years ago
Is it healthy psychologically to express ourselves emotionally over social media, e.g. in Facebook statuses?
Yes you are right that there are psychological consequences not only for the poster but also for those reading the post. I think the main issue regarding the poster is the addictive quality of creating the posts but from the viewer's side there are psychological issues because you immediately compare your 'behind-the-scenes' life with the filtered 'stage' life the poster is creating. Could you perhaps provide the links to the articles you are referring to? I would really appreciate it!
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Anna Zawilska
Posted over 2 years ago
What can we learn about social media and society in general from the hype generated by Kony 2012?
I totally agree that popularity on the internet is assigned rather randomly. I agree with your concerns regarding these viral internet campaigns, but I still can't help but feel that if only we could understand the culture of the online community and what characteristics make certain media more likely to catch attention it could be used in a more constructive way to bring needed awareness. I feel that right now the internet is used for shallow purposes and full depth of what is possible has not yet been documented.
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Anna Zawilska
Posted over 2 years ago
What can we learn about social media and society in general from the hype generated by Kony 2012?
I wonder if general awareness of the world and important issues has increased due to the internet. For example, has the amount of money given to charity and volunteer work increased proportionally with increase in information access? I suspect that probably not. So what makes people want to get in on the action in this issue? Is it something very quick and easy that makes people think that are making a difference where they actually are not? How can we excite people to the point that they want to make a persistant contribution to good causes? Does it take a well-made emotional movie everyday?
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Anna Zawilska
Posted over 2 years ago
When the brand others have made for you overwhelms the real you, how do you re-brand yourself as yourself?
I am not sure that re-branding can be done in it's entirety through a shift in physical environment alone. In my opinion, the first step to re-branding is to try to remove the idea that you have anything to lose by doing so. One of the most frustrating things about success is that instead of giving you confidence it can also make you feel more pressurised to continue on a certain path to more of the same kind of success even though that may not be what you desire. At a certain point, success of a certain kind begins to shift from wholesome and empowering to controlling and at that stage it needs to be seen as a poison. Not recognising this shift is ignoring the natural urges of re-branding simply because we become too comfortable in existing success and we allow fear to spawn self-doubt. Also, I want to question the importance of the term 're-branding'. Any change in perspective, activites etc of a person that come from sincere personal development in a person will show through and the way you are perceived will change. Instead of approaching it externally as a process of re-branding, I want to suggest personal growth and development be the main issues here. How do we use success constructively as a growing force rather than an eventual constricting force?
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Anna Zawilska
Posted over 2 years ago
Is it healthy psychologically to express ourselves emotionally over social media, e.g. in Facebook statuses?
I do find that people appear quite different when viewed through their online personas. I was reflecting on the more old-fashioned form of dealing with everyday frustrations and emotions. Before social media, there was more of a boundary between a person's everyday existance as they appeared in general and the details of what they were experiencing and what they were facing on a more personal level. There are instances where people post a lot of "ranting" statuses that do not receive many comments or much reaction, but they continue to do so. I was wondering if people are being falsely lead into feeling that this type of expression justifies their feelings and they use it as some sort of crutch. I wonder if you disallow social media use for one day, how many people will have difficulty dealing with their frustrations and emotions within the realms of their physical interactions. I also tend to think that one thing lacking in broadcasting feelings through social media is tone. Unless the language used is sufficiently descriptive (which commonly it is not), the statuses can become very one-dimensional.