Josh Mayourian

Student , Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art
Roslyn, NY, United States

About Josh

Bio

I'm a Sophomore Chemical Engineer at Cooper Union. I plan on minoring in mathematics and biomedical engineering. Hopefully one day I will become a doctor.

Education: THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART New York, NY

Bachelor of Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Projected May 2014

Relevant Coursework: General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry I/II, Physical Chemistry, Mechanics, Bioengineering Application to Sports Medicine, Biological Systems, Bioelectricity

Project Work/Research: Organic Synthesis of Compounds for the Inhibition of HIV-1 via TAT-TAR Interaction
Winter 2011-Present

Data Collection for Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated with PCCP
Summer 2011

Design of Entertaining and Effective Exercise Machines for Obese Teens
Fall 2010

Experience: COOPER UNION, New York, New York
January 2012-Present Tutor Assisting Freshmen and Sophomore students in Mathematics (Calculus I, II)

ELMHURST HOSPITAL, Jackson Heights, New York
July 2011 – August 2011 Volunteer Observed Orthopedic Surgeons. Assisted Data Collection for Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated with PCCP

SELF EMPLOYED, Roslyn, New York
September 2009 - June 2010 Tutor Instructed students in Physics, Math, Chemistry

SID JACOBSON JCC, Roslyn, New York
February 2009
Hurricane Katrina Relief Volunteer Helped rebuild houses in New Orleans post-Hurricane Katrina

BETH SHALOM DAY CAMP, Roslyn, New York
June-August 2008, 2009
Lifeguard, Instructor Obtained 1A lifeguard and CPR certification. Monitored pool and checked pH of pool. Instructed children on all different levels how to swim.

CHABAD OF PORT WASHINGTON, Port Washington, New York September 2008
Nursing Home Assistant
Assisted the elderly with accomplishing daily tasks
Skills: • Laboratory Equipment: Analytical Balance, Gas Chromatograph, Mass Spectrometer, Absorption Spectrometer • Computer Programs: Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft Outlook, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Python, QBasic64
• Languages: Fluent in Hebrew and conversant in Spanish
• CPR certified

Honors: • The Cooper Union, Dean’s List, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011
• The Cooper Union, Full-tuition scholarship, 2010-2014
• Unsung Hero, 2010
• Long Island Math Fair, Silver Medal, 2009
Memberships: • The Cooper Union Basketball Team, Point Guard
September 2010- Present
• Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America, Treasurer
January 2011-Present
• The National Society of Collegiate Scholars
January 2010-Present

Languages

English, Hebrew, Spanish

Areas of Expertise

Chemical Engineering, Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering

I'm passionate about

Soccer, basketball, education, exercising, video games, monopoly, pictionary, volunteering, medicine, math

People don't know I'm good at

Mario Party 2. I hardly ever lose mini games (never lost the ice skating and baseball challenges)

Comments & conversations

144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Does society need more interdisciplinary work? Or more well-rounded individuals working together?
Steven, Wow! The quote you share above was very interesting! What definitely made me think about your question the most was the part "Generalists should be the upbeat, positive people in the profession while specialists should be their grouchy, negative counterparts." This is an interesting thought, but I don't particularly believe in this idea. Great conversation topic!
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Can we "engineer" our own interests through repeated exposure?
Ariel, I too can relate to my experiences in my secondary education to answer this question. From when I was young, my parents pushed me toward math and science. This reflected to my experiences in the classroom, as I always favored math more than humanities. However, my school also played a huge role in this, as they separated students based on their mathematics abilities and humanities abilities. They pushed students to take honors and AP courses. Those who weren't pushed to felt as if they weren't suited for the material, and it may have held them back from pursuing that material. I was pushed to take AP's in math and science, but not in humanities. This made me more influenced to pursue an engineering path.
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
How are different body parts connected to the emotions we traditionally associate with them?
Rafael, Wow, type 3 diabetes is definitely interesting and different from types 1 and 2. Type 3 diabetes is described as: "A problem with insulin production in the brain is thought to result in the formation of protein "plaque"---not unlike that which is found among suffers of Type 1 (insulin-dependant) and Type 2 diabetes (insulin-resistant). But in the case of diabetes Type 3, plaque appears in the brain and leads to memory loss and problems forming memories." Check out the link that gives more information. http://www.livestrong.com/article/22165-diabetes-type/#ixzz1qM1X7IaH
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
What is the power behind a shared experience?
Johnson, I find it very interesting how you discuss coaching, and commonality of purpose. I don't know if this is the "coaching" direction you were trying to take, but, I have been involved in sports all my life, and this is highly applicable. Through working together, and working at a common goal, some powerful bond stays together forever. I still talk about great experiences developed from a basketball team I was part of over 5 years ago with former teammates. Through this sports team I can totally agree with your statement that 'the "shared experience" of a problem or situation releases creativity and possibility beyond the ability of one person.' In a sense, teamwork takes place at the micro level, as you have discussed in the body. There are so many different processes involved in the body's functions, and to make each bodily function occur, many biophysical or biochemical processes must occur that is behind the scenes.
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Can technology replace human intelligence?
Peter, The work that google does blows me away. You are definitely right that the internet becomes more and more complex, while the human brain isn't becoming that much more complicated. However, you must consider: So much time has been spent on understanding the body, brain, etc. After all this time, we still do not completely understand the mind and body. I find it hard to believe that we will ever be able to understand the mind! Even if we are able to make a model of the mind to help us do AI work, it will never be perfect. That is what makes me believe that we will never be able to perfectly model the human brain.
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Will we ever truly be able to model nature?
It's interesting the two different effects of modeling nature you both discuss. In a different post, Soheila, you bring up a very important negative result of our knowledge being applied to nature (pollution). However, Anthony discusses how modeling nature can lead to resolving some of the greatest problems faced by individuals. This theme of effects of modeling nature seems like a great topic, and I'd love to hear more people's views on this!
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Will we ever truly be able to model nature?
Theo, It's great to see that these problems have been solved, and shows the progress we have made. I watched a TED talk from many years back discussing these ideas, and it was a mistake not to check whether these problems have been solved yet. I will update the information above. From solving these problems in nature, biomimicry has had many great applications. Please do check out this link below! http://brainz.org/15-coolest-cases-biomimicry/ However, there are so many different examples of problems in nature we are yet to solve. I would love to hear your input regarding this question presented.
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Will we ever truly be able to model nature?
Bernd, No need to be sorry about your second thought. I'm glad your honest about how you feel about this. How would you phrase this question? Also, please do think about the following: Another concept we try to understand and model is the human body. Bioelectricity, and more generally, biophysics and biomathematics, are subjects highly studied. Why? Many people may simply do so out of curiosity. Others may believe that by being able to model the body well, humans are able to advance and improve the health of the population. Many people may find it just as important to model nature, as there can be many applications that could help the population worldwide. While we have advanced so well that we can make robots and machines as seen in the TED talks posted above, there are still more ways to improve. Again, please do share how you would phrase the question, as I'm sure it could definitely help answer a question that I'd be interested in as well.
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Will we ever truly be able to model nature?
Thomas and Michael, Using Runge-Kutta methods when programming to approximate, we are able to estimate very well, but only in an ideal setting. Nature is far from an ideal setting. Therefore, I totally agree with you, as nature is so complex that changes would occur in a way that no approximation method used will be able to model perfectly.
144596
Josh Mayourian
Posted over 2 years ago
Will we ever truly be able to model nature?
Nicholas, Thanks for sharing your own experience, and you definitely are not alone. You bring up a key point: certain educational values should be taught at a very young age. Hopefully we exploit that more to be able to accomplish some more amazing feats